Revealed: How many eggs you can eat in a week

For many years there has been discussion around how many eggs it is safe to eat in any given day or week, and now researchers have come to the rescue with an answer.

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that there is no risk when eating up to as many as 12 eggs in seven days, particularly when it comes to  cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. 

The researchers from Sydney University found that weight loss was similar over a year for people on a low-egg (two a week) and a high-egg (12 a week) diet.

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that there is no risk when eating up to as many as 12 eggs in seven days, particularly when it comes to  cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes.  Source: Getty Images / Stock image

“A healthy diet based on population guidelines and including more eggs than currently recommended by some countries may be safely consumed,” concluded the researchers.

The findings differ to the recommendation made by the National Heart Foundation guidelines that says it’s safe to eat just six eggs in a week.

The extended study tracked a broad range of cardiovascular risk factors including cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure, with no significant difference in results between the high egg and low egg groups.

“While eggs themselves are high in dietary cholesterol – and people with type 2 diabetes tend to have higher levels of the ‘bad’ low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol – this study supports existing research that shows consumption of eggs has little effect on the levels of cholesterol in the blood of the people eating them,” researchers said.

Eggs are a high source of protein and micronutrients. Source: Getty Images / Stock image

Researchers said eggs are a valuable source of protein and should be included in any healthy diet.

“Eggs are a source of protein and micronutrients that could support a range of health and dietary factors including helping to regulate the intake of fat and carbohydrate, eye and heart health, healthy blood vessels and healthy pregnancies.”