Palmer eyes Des Headland

Rhianna King

Mining magnate Clive Palmer has prominent indigenous West Australians Des Headland and Robert Isaacs in his sights as he seeks to recruit Federal election candidates for his political party.

Mr Palmer will fly to Perth today and is expected to announce the Palmer United Party's WA candidates tomorrow, but _The West Australian _ understands nominations are yet to be finalised in a number of electorates.

Mr Headland, a former AFL player who now works at the Clontarf Academy in Broome, confirmed he had been contacted by Mr Palmer's office.

"I've had one conversation which has sparked a bit of interest," he said. "I haven't had a big think about it or spoken to my family.

"There's nothing set in stone or anything yet, but who knows.

"I'm only a 32-year-old and still learning my way and it was just a quick phone call to say G'day."

Mr Isaacs, a Noongar elder and member of the Stolen Generation who has been involved in local government, health delivery and government policy, is being targeted to run in the seat of Durack, held by Liberal Barry Haase.

Mr Isaacs, who works in social lending at Keystart Loans, said he would meet Mr Palmer this week before deciding whether to nominate. "It took me by surprise," he said. "I haven't made a decision yet but I appreciate them looking for high-profile indigenous people."

But he questioned the timing, just months out from an election, and said the process felt rushed.

Mr Isaacs is on the State Government's Aboriginal Advisory Council and is a former deputy mayor of the City of Gosnells.

He said his commitment to the Aboriginal community was his main priority.

"I've got unfinished business in health, housing and with Clontarf," he said.

A spokesman for Mr Palmer said interest had been "extremely strong" for all House of Representatives seats and Senate seats.

He confirmed Teresa van Lieshout had been dis-endorsed as the candidate for Fremantle after it emerged she had described the global financial crisis as "a typical Antichrist strategy" and said hurricane Sandy was sent by God to warn against globalisation.