School forced to apologise after parents complain about immigration homework

A western Sydney public school has apologised to parents complaining that Year 5 and 6 students were issued a homework question asking whether Australia is accepting too many immigrants.

Whalan Public School issued students a multiple-choice assignment, asking them seven questions about their stance on immigration.

The final question asked students “do you think that the number of migrants coming to Australia each year is too high, too low or about right?”

Unimpressed parents took to Facebook to voice their frustrations, saying they were stunned that 11-year-old students were being asked such questions.

Whalan Public School in Sydney's west has apologised to parents after students were issued the migration survey. Source: Google Street View
Whalan Public School in Sydney's west has apologised to parents after students were issued the migration survey. Source: Google Street View
The seven question survey asked if migrants should have to learn english and follow Australian traditions. Source: Supplied
The seven question survey asked if migrants should have to learn english and follow Australian traditions. Source: Supplied

"I'm still baffled at the idea of how they intended 11/12 year olds to answer those question,” one woman wrote.

“I majorly studied this in year 11 and 12, not year 5/6 damn."

“How about they stick to teaching our kids to bloody spell, read and add up?" another added.

On Tuesday, the school issued a letter out to parents apologising for any offence the survey may have caused.

The school issued an apology to parents but stood by the unit of work. Source: Supplied
The school issued an apology to parents but stood by the unit of work. Source: Supplied


“The intent of the survey was to ask students to reflect upon their current thinking about Australia and its people.

“However, unfortunately, the closed questioning style has resulted in some inflamed responses from parents who are questioning the units of work being taught in classroom.”

While acknowledging that the questions should have been more "open-ended", the school insisted the units of work undertaken in year 5/6 classrooms were in line with the current syllabus documents.

Whalan Public School declined an approach by Yahoo7 News for further comment.

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