'Move your car': Debate over driver's controversial driveway act

·3-min read

A driver who sought advice about parking on a crowded residential street has sparked a heated debate about how much space should be left when parking next to a driveway.

The woman shared a series of images to social media which show a small silver hatchback tightly slotted between two driveways on a suburban street in the Byron Bay region.

The woman shared a series of images to social media which show a small silver hatchback tightly slotted between two driveways on a suburban street in the Byron Bay region, sparking a heated debate about parking on crowded streets. Source: Facebook
A driver has taken to social media seeking advice after her neighbour complained about where she was parking her car. Source: Facebook

“The owner of the house to the right says this isn’t a parking spot and that he can have my car towed by council, or that ‘if he crashes into my car one day it’s not his fault’ because he doesn’t have enough space to get out of the driveway,” she posted to a closed community Facebook group.

“To me, he’s got plenty of space and since there’s no official law in NSW for not parking within 1.8m of a driveway (SA has such a law) I don’t see a problem with it. Does anyone know/has advice on what (to) do? Thanks.”

The woman shared a series of images to social media which show a small silver hatchback tightly slotted between two driveways on a suburban street in the Byron Bay region, sparking a heated debate about parking on crowded streets. Source: Facebook
The post sparked a heated debate about how close drivers should park to a driveway. Source: Facebook

                      

Driver encouraged to park somewhere else

Her innocent query clearly struck a chord with those who have experienced the blood-curdling rage of being parked in. 

“You’re game parking that close to the driveway behind your car. I'd be pissed if you were that close to my driveway because my car wouldn't have the turning circle it needs without crossing into the other lane,” one person wrote.

One person quipped: “Just move your car - problem solved”.

Another said it was “unreasonable” to park there.

“Not in the least, this prevents them having a guest or if someone of their own needs to park there.”

“To be honest I have the same thing outside my house where people park on each side of my driveway and yes it is very annoying to have to drive out like that, there’s no law but if you can park somewhere else then it would be a nice thing to do,” another responded.

One woman said she felt sorry for the neighbour.

“I have a car that parks pretty close to my driveway and when I back out it is very hard to see oncoming traffic. It can be very dangerous,” she wrote.

“Honestly, even if it's OK that would piss me off too, having to swing out just to get past your car. Sorry, but whilst it might be a parking spot, it looks awfully close to the driveway,” another person wrote.

The woman shared a series of images to social media which show a small silver hatchback tightly slotted between two driveways on a suburban street in the Byron Bay region, sparking a heated debate about parking on crowded streets. Source: Facebook
Hundreds commented on the post, debating whether her parking spot was legal or safe. Source: Facebook

But those who know the headache of struggling to find a spot were quick to jump to the woman’s defence. 

“If he hits your car, he shouldn’t have a licence. You can park there no worries.”

“I don’t see a problem either. Ignore him,” another responded.

Another said: “It's a public space, park where you want and tell him to shove it.”

While one person reasoned it was “legal but annoying”.

“Box of beer should fix it, find out what he drinks,” suggested another.

What is the rule for parking across a driveway?

In NSW, the rule isn’t clear-cut.

You must not stop or park your vehicle “across a driveway”, unless you’re picking up or dropping off passengers. It’s a $272 fine if you do.

However, there is no legislated parking distance like South Australia has, leading to confusion and frustration among drivers and property owners.

In South Australia, the law specifies the legal parking distance from a driveway is 1.8 metres of the "approach or departure side of such an entrance, exit, laneway, driveway, crossing place or other vehicular pathway."

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