Who's at fault? Mini dragged by truck after attempting to merge

Video of an accident in Sydney's north has divided opinion: who is really at fault?

A blue Mini Cooper sits in a left-turn lane with traffic at a standstill and indicates to move into the next lane on Epping Road near the exit to Sam Johnson Way on Monday.

A truck sits stationary, but as the Mini tries to get fully into the right lane, the truck begins to move and shove the car forward a few metres.

The Mini turns back into the left lane and both vehicles keep going through the green light.

The Mini Cooper begins to merge into the right lane. Source: Facebook/Dash Cam Owners Australia
The Mini Cooper begins to merge into the right lane. Source: Facebook/Dash Cam Owners Australia

The video on Dash Cam Owners Australia's Facebook page has more than 117,000 views on Facebook and 2,600 likes, but viewers are divided as to who's actually at fault.

One user said the truck driver "is a loose cannon" and added while the car cut into the right lane, "there is no justification for the truck driver's actions".

Another suggested the truck driver did it on purpose because they had lost patience.

The truck begins to push the Mini Cooper as traffic speeds up. Source: Facebook/ Dash Cam Owners Australia
The truck begins to push the Mini Cooper as traffic speeds up. Source: Facebook/ Dash Cam Owners Australia

But others were quick to defend the truck driver, with a number claiming the car had driven into the driver's blind spot.

One man, who claims to drive a flat nose truck, said he wouldn't have seen the Mini Cooper in the same situation.

Another truckie included a photo of a truck rammed into the side of the car.

"To all you d******* drivers who think sitting in a trucks blind spot is OK, guess again," he said.

The driver turns back into the left lane. Source: Dash Cam Owners Australia
The driver turns back into the left lane. Source: Dash Cam Owners Australia

"Yes, this is me driving this truck and this is a result of sitting in a blind spot of a truck."

Another man included a still from the video with lines drawn across to illustrate the blind spot.

"The line of sight is from the driver's head, to the edge of the window/wind screen," he wrote.

"Stop being stupid around trucks."

Some Facebook users said the driver was in a blind spot. One provided this diagram. Source: Facebook/ Damian Blair Lukawski
Some Facebook users said the driver was in a blind spot. One provided this diagram. Source: Facebook/ Damian Blair Lukawski

The NSW State Government ran a "Be Truck Aware" campaign in November with NRMA.

Part of that campaign included a video informing drivers to be careful of blind spots. The video saw three drivers with a combined 40 years of experience behind the wheel of a truck.

When asked, none of them said they could see anything in their mirrors or directly in front of them.

After stepping out of the truck, it was revealed a number of pedestrians were standing in front of the vehicle, a motorbike rider on the driver's side and a group of cyclists on the left.

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