KFC forced to change menu due to product shortage

·News Reporter
·2-min read

Flooding in NSW and Queensland has left the KFC menu tasting ‘finger lickin’ different.

The fast food chain has been forced to swap out a key ingredient in its burgers and wraps after the severe weather resulted in a lettuce shortage.

The Colonel is now using a lettuce and cabbage blend on all products containing lettuce until further notice.

Signs advertising the substitute have gone up in KFC stores and in the drive-thru lane, as well as on its website.

“We’ve hit a bit of an Iceberg and are currently experiencing some lettuce supply chain disruptions due the impacts of the recent Queensland and NSW floods,” the statement online reads.

KFC has told customers that it will be using a lettuce and cabbage blend as it struggles to cope with food shortages. Source: Channel Nine
KFC has told customers that it will be using a lettuce and cabbage blend as it struggles to cope with food shortages. Source: Channel Nine

“This means you may see a temporary blend of lettuce and cabbage throughout KFC restaurants in NSW, Victoria, Queensland, the ACT and Tasmania during these shortages.”

Customers, both in store and online, do have the option to customise their order and remove lettuce from their meal.

The fast food giant says it is working with its multiple suppliers to provide them with support, but is expecting disruptions to continue in the coming days.

Months of rain has ruined vegetable crops in Queensland. Source: Getty
Months of rain has ruined vegetable crops in Queensland. Source: Getty

Rescue package needed for flood-affected farmers

As a result of one of the wettest starts to the year on record, product shortages are being felt across the food industry.

An iceberg lettuce recently made national headlines after it was spotted on sale for $12 at an Aussie supermarket.

Growcom, Queensland’s peak horticulture body, says some lettuce farmers have lost their third crop in a row after months of rain.

“A week ago, if you’d been out to the Lockyer Valley, you would have smelt rotting crops,” acting chief executive Richard Shannon told ABC Radio Brisbane.

“It’s been a devastating time for lettuce growers, and it means, sadly, these growers will leave the industry.”

Growcom is calling for a multi-million dollar relief package to save the industry.

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