Your Evening Briefing

David Rovella
Your Evening Briefing

(Bloomberg) --

U.S. intelligence experts say Russia is once again trying to manipulate a presidential election in President Donald Trump’s favor. Meanwhile, former Goldman Sachs Chairman Lloyd Blankfein said that if the Democratic Party’s nominee is Senator Bernie Sanders, he may choose Trump. Sanders has a history of excoriating Blankfein and his bank for, among other things, the massive taxpayer bailout it raked in during the financial crisis. In response to previous attacks by Blankfein, Sanders has quoted President Franklin Roosevelt, asking to be judged “by the enemies I have made.” 

Here are today’s top stories

Blankfein explained that “at least Trump cares about the economy.” On Thursday, however, the White House admitted that Trump’s trade war on China has depressed the U.S. economy. On Friday, Trump (in all caps on Twitter) floated the possibility of another bailout for farmers hurt by tariffs, on top of the $26 billion taxpayers have already paid them. The reason? Purchases of crops agreed to by China have yet to materialize. 

While China still accounts for the vast majority of coronavirus cases,  infections may be spreading more rapidly in other Asian countries.

The World Health Organization is worried about a jump in coronavirus cases in Iran, since they have no direct link to China. Some two-thirds of cases exported from China may still be undetected, a study showed.

There’s a pistachio war being waged between the U.S. and Iran, Bloomberg Businessweek reports, and the nation of Georgia may be part of the fight.

The world is headed toward the warmest winter ever recorded as a strange mix of weather patterns at the top of the world combines with accelerating climate change.

Senator Amy Klobuchar, who gained momentum after her performance in the New Hampshire Democratic primary, may have hit a wall.

What’s Luke Kawa thinking about? The Bloomberg cross-asset reporter contends the exceptionalism in U.S. Treasuries stands out as the most curious dynamic in financial markets right now. Since the coronavirus became a part of the picture, there has been no divergence between U.S. and German yields. In fact, the spread between the two has marginally narrowed. It’s a testament, Luke says, to the preeminence of Treasuries as a destination for global money in search of safety. This is because nothing about the data suggests that the spread between U.S. and German yields should be narrowing now. 

What you’ll need to know tomorrow

Boeing’s deadly 737 Max is still causing trouble for the planemaker. Warren Buffett will address his missed deals and growing cash pile. For average Americans, middle class life is now out of reach. ECB economist sees a euro-area rebound from coronavirus fallout. Bloomberg Opinion: Democrats need to attack Sanders head on. Bloomberg Opinion: How to make trucking safer for everyone. Is there such a thing as a guilt-free engagement ring?

What you’ll want to read in Bloomberg Pursuits

In 1981, Milton Bradley released what may be the most Generation X board game ever. The Dark Tower was a fantasy adventure with flashing lights and sound effects emanating from a titular plastic tower. Four decades later, Gen Xers are entering middle age, with children whose hands seem welded to smartphones. Perhaps out of nostalgia or a last-ditch effort to engage their offspring, parents are now looking back to a time when fun didn’t require a glowing screen.

 

To contact the author of this story: David Rovella in New York at drovella@bloomberg.net

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