Baden-Clay's bizarre car crash two days after Allison's death

New details have emerged about a bizarre car crash convicted wife killer Gerard Baden-Clay had just two days after he reported Allison missing.

Baden-Clay acted strangely after he slammed his car into a wall in 2012, repeatedly saying “sorry” and asking for his lawyer, it has been revealed.

Details of the crash have been recorded in the updated edition of the book The Murder of Allison Baden-Clay.

Gerard Baden-Clay. Source: Supplied.

In the book, author David Murray details the legal saga that ensued after Baden-Clay was charged with the murder and further details about the case, News Corp reports.

Baden-Clay was found guilty of murdering his wife in 2014 but the charge was later downgraded to manslaughter by the Court of Appeal.

The decision was later criticised by the High Court, which reinstated the murder conviction and life sentnce.

Baden-Clay had crashed his car, without breaking, into a concrete pylon when he was travelling at about 50km/h.

He then crawled from the car wreck, using his hands to drag himself along the ground as though his legs were paralysed.

When a 17-year-old boy, known as ‘Mike’, ran over to help after he witnessed the crash, Baden-Clay said to him: “I need my lawyer", News Corp has reported.

The couple in happier times on their wedding day. Source: Facebook.

The former real estate agent kept repeating the phrase until another onlooker asked why he felt he needed one.

Paramedic Louise Winter, who arrived on the scene a short time later, asked Baden-Clay if he had any pain to which he replied: “All over my body. I need to speak to my lawyer. Where’s Darren?”

His lawyer Darren Mahony – who Baden-Clay was on his way to meet – soon arrived at the scene.

Gerard Baden-Clay was convicted of murdering his wife Allison. Photo: 7News

“Can you tell me what’s going on? Are you his lawyer?” Ms Winter asked.

“He’s been under a lot of stress lately,” Mr Mahony said.

Ms Winter said in a statement she asked if there was anything she needed to know about Baden-Clay.

“I’m not allowed to say anything,” the lawyer replied.

“Sorry mate, I’m sorry,” Baden-Clay told his lawyer.

In another statement to police, firefighter, Brendan Flynn, said he heard Baden-Clay say “sorry” at least 20 times.

When paramedics cut his shirt from his body, despite his demands for them not to, scratch marks were revealed on his torso, providing new evidence for the trial that his wife had fought back before her death.

Scratches were revealed on Baden-Clay. Source: Supplied

Investigators believe Baden-Clay’s bizarre behaviour at the crash scene could have been him at breaking point, ready to confess to murdering his wife.

After the crash Baden-Clay was assessed by mental health nurse Nat Karmichael.

He requested his sister, Olivia Walton, to remain by his side for “legal reasons”.

According to Ms Karmichael’s statement to police, Ms Walton interrupted to say “Gerard, do not answer those questions” when the nurse asked about his relationship with Mrs Baden-Clay.