Bicycle Queensland calling for truce between cyclists, motorists

Simon Love

Bicycle Queensland is calling for a "truce" between cyclists and motorists, claiming tensions and crashes are on the rise.

They've released shocking new video of the so-called "war on our roads" showing clashes between the two.

Drivers say it's a two way street, but agree a change of attitude could save lives.

A camera on the back of Geoffrey James' bike captures the moment of impact. Source: 7 News
A camera on the back of Geoffrey James' bike captures the moment of impact. Source: 7 News

Cyclist Geoffrey James was driving along busy Wynnum Road when he was knocked to the ground.

As he lay on the road in pain, the driver offered excuses, saying, "please man, I'm running late to work, man. I tell you, nothing happened."

Geoffrey was forced to try and call emergency services himself as the driver told him to "get up".

The driver offers up excuses while the cyclist languishes on the ground. Source: 7 News
The driver offers up excuses while the cyclist languishes on the ground. Source: 7 News

The encounter has highlighted the tensions between drivers and cyclists on Australian roads.

Bicycle Queensland CEO Anne Savage claims respect from motorists is at an all-time low and serious road crashes involving cyclists are costing the economy nearly $150 million a year.

Bicycle Queensland CEO Anne Savage says many cyclists are
Bicycle Queensland CEO Anne Savage says many cyclists are

"Most of them [cyclists] tell me they are scared of traffic," Ms Savage said.

"Some of them are terrified."

On the streets, views are mixed.

Tensions between drivers and cyclists are on the rise. Source: 7 News
Tensions between drivers and cyclists are on the rise. Source: 7 News

"The majority of cyclists are very good, but some on Saturday or Sunday treat it like the Tour de France," one motorist said.

But one man, a cyclist himself, described bike-riders as "their own biggest problem."

This man said cyclists were
This man said cyclists were

The RACQ's Steve Spalding doubts the "war on the roads" hype, saying, "there's no hostilities, there's no aggro."

So, if cyclists and motorists must share the same road in harmony, should they equally be accountable by having a registration plate?

Bicycle Queensland says no.

"Most cyclists also do own cars and do pay rego," Ms Savage said.

Meanwhile, Geoffrey James is back on his bike and regaining confidence after his crash.

Geoffrey James is back on his bike and regaining his confidence. Source: 7 News
Geoffrey James is back on his bike and regaining his confidence. Source: 7 News

"There are some bad tensions, but let's try to break the tensions down," he said.

"The roads are there to share."