Aldi claims simple move can save Aussies $2,468 a year

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·News Reporter
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Aldi has released its 2022 Price Report which reveals how Australian families can save thousands a year by switching their shop to the discount supermarket.

The Price Report, which uses data analysed by PwC, confirmed the average family can save $1,555 a year by switching their shop to Aldi instead of a competitor supermarket.

Aussie shoppers can also save a massive $2,468 a year by choosing Aldi’s own products, rather than the equivalent branded products.

Aldi's 2022 Price Report price gap graph comparing competitors
Aldi's 2022 Price Report reveals a massive price gap of 15.6 per cent, compared to the cheapest products at the nearest competitor. Source: Aldi Australia

​​The report revealed that in 2021, Aldi helped save its customers a total of $2.7 billion on groceries.

It’s not just Aldi shoppers who have reaped the benefits of these savings. Non-Aldi shoppers have saved $7 billion since the chain arrived on Aussie shores in 2001 the report says, due to the downward price pressure Aldi has put on grocery prices.

Aussie shoppers feel the cost-of-living pressure

Aldi’s savings couldn’t come at a more critical time, as the data found that almost all Aussie shoppers have felt the pressure of rising costs of everyday items like groceries, petrol and household bills, compared to previous years.

Four in five Aussies who participated in the study shared concerns about the affordability of living costs in the next year, while over half are most worried about grocery affordability.

Meanwhile, the struggle is real across the country, as two-thirds (65 per cent) of Australians admit to feeling financial pressure in the past year.

Graph showing Aldi grocery prices compared to other supermarkets
The report found Aussies can save across all groceries by buying Aldi products instead of equivalent branded products. Source: Aldi Australia

Price is understandably now the single-most important factor in the weekly grocery shop, with almost half of shoppers taking greater consideration of price in the last year.

Surprisingly, only one in 10 Australian shoppers have switched supermarkets as a strategy to save money.

Aldi Australia vows to ‘double down’ on low prices

Oliver Bongardt, Managing Director, Aldi Australia said the report confirms the price of groceries has never been more important to Australian shoppers.

“Our message is clear – we don’t want to see Aussies cutting down on meat or other loved items because they are now considered a luxury. We know inflationary pressure is real, but this research shows in black and white that by making the switch to Aldi, there are real savings available.” Mr Bongardt said.

He said Aldi has always understood the “power of price” and the value they can bring to their customers, which is why the supermarket plans to double down on maintaining its “low price leadership”.

Aldi supermarket open during the day
Aldi vowed to 'double down' on maintaining their low prices amid the rising costs of groceries. Source: Getty

“As Australians face the headwinds of increased costs across many household categories – we are here to commit that we will never give up on offering Australian shoppers the best possible prices in the market,” he said.

“We will maintain our price gap to our competitors, even if some prices on individual items do go up. Every aspect of Aldi in Australia was built to offer the lowest prices in the market from our smaller format stores to our carefully curated range of high-quality groceries.”

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