Woolworths, Coles, Aldi price hikes: The simple switch you can make for big savings

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·News Reporter
·4-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

As Woolworths, Coles, and Aldi shoppers seek cost-efficient ways to integrate fruit and vegetables into their diets amid widespread food shortages and price hikes, we've crunched the numbers to reveal how much shoppers can save by switching from fresh to frozen produce.

Not only can it save you money, but it also doesn't mean sacrificing on nutrition.

Woolworths, Coles and Aldi signs; chopped frozen vegetables
Experts urge shoppers to buy Aussie-grown produce in season at Coles, Woolworths and Aldi to avoid import costs associated with vegetables. Source: Getty Images

Whopping price differences between fresh and frozen vegetables

A check of Woolworths and Coles' online shopping pages reveals stark differences between the cost of fresh and frozen vegetables.

At Woolworths for example, one fresh broccoli retails at $3.27, while 500g of its frozen counterpart will cost you $2.70. At Coles, four cobs of fresh corn will cost $7.20, while 1kg of frozen corn cobs is priced at only $2.70.

Professor of marketing and consumer behaviour at QUT Gary Mortimer told Yahoo News that "frozen vegetables tend to be an underestimated commodity".

"When you're faced with creating a meal from scratch, using frozen produce is significantly less expensive than buying individual vegetables, which is an attractive option for Aussies who are struggling with inflation," he said.

Coles worker at fresh produce shelves
Woolworths, Coles and Aldi shoppers can make big savings by opting for frozen vegetables. Source: Getty Images

Savings revealed

A look at the cost of seven fresh produce items versus their store-brand frozen counterparts has revealed that Woolies shoppers could save $38.47, while Coles customers could make a saving of $33.30.

Woolworths:

Fresh broccoli (each): $3.27

Frozen broccoli (1kg) $2.70

Fresh blueberries (500g): $24

Frozen blueberries (500g): $5.50

Fresh corn cobs (1kg): $12

Frozen corn cobs (1kg): $2.70

Fresh beans (500g): $5.45

Frozen beans (500g): $2.50

Fresh carrots (500g): $1

Frozen carrots (500g): $2.35

Fresh cauliflower (each): $5.90

Frozen cauliflower (500g): $2.40

Fresh Brussels sprouts (500g): $7.50

Frozen Brussels sprouts (500g): $2.50

Total: $59.12

Total: $20.65

Coles:

Fresh broccoli (500g): $4.45

Frozen broccoli (500g): $2.70

Fresh blueberries (500g): $24

Frozen blueberries (500g): $5.50

Fresh corn cobs (4): $7.20

Frozen corn cobs (1kg): $2.70

Fresh beans (500g): $5.45

Frozen beans (500g): $2.50

Fresh carrots (500g): $1.10

Frozen carrots (500g): $2.35

Fresh cauliflower (each): $4.50

Frozen cauliflower broccoli mix (500g): $2.40

Fresh Brussels sprouts (500g): $7.25

Frozen Brussels sprouts (500g): $2.50

Total: $53.95

Total: $20.65

Are frozen vegetables just as good for you?

Professor Mortimer noted that while fresh vegetables sit "exposed in the elements" in warehouses and supermarket produce sections, snap-frozen vegetables are "just as nutritious as fresh produce".

Dietitian and nutritionist Ashleigh Jones APD backed up Mortimer's claim, telling Yahoo News that frozen vegetables are "every bit as healthy as fresh vegetables".

"In some cases, frozen can be even healthier. This is because frozen vegetables are snap-frozen shortly after harvest, which preserves their nutrient content, whereas fresh vegetables can be kept in cold storage for weeks or even months before you purchase them," Ms Jones said.

Mixed frozen vegetables in wooden bowl
The difference between fresh, frozen, pre-prepared and even canned vegetables is minimal, says dietitian and nutritionist Ashleigh Jones. Source: Getty Images

Ms Jones also said that a vegetable’s makeup and fibre content do not noticeably change during freezing.

"The most notable difference is to the texture, which is less obvious with things like peas and corn, but a bit more obvious when it comes to broccoli, cauliflower and pumpkin," she said.

"This texture difference will only impact nutrition indirectly – we don’t eat what we don’t enjoy, so choosing your vegetables in the form you like the best will give you the most nutritional benefits.

"Ultimately the difference between fresh, frozen, pre-prepared and even canned veg is so minimal, we should just focus on choosing the veg we enjoy and can afford."

Do you have a story tip? Email: newsroomau@yahoonews.com.

You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Twitter and download the Yahoo News app from the App Store or Google Play.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting