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WATCH: Huge wasp drags paralysed spider back to its young

If you’re sick and tired of finding creepy cockroaches around the house, this footage of a spider-wasp dragging a paralysed huntsman across a kitchen floor should serve as a reminder that things could be a lot worse.

The remarkably strong wasp can then be seen dragging the spider up the wall of a Sydney home to provide a serious meal for its awaiting larvae.

"It came in the back door while we were doing some DIY and started dragging the thing around the place," video creator Adam Farrow-Palmer explained to Mashable.

“It’s the biggest wasp I’ve seen in my life."

The spider was no match for the spider wasp. Source: YouTube
The spider was no match for the spider wasp. Source: YouTube

“I didn’t know they could get this big.”

The amused cameraman then asked his mate to hold something up alongside to measure just how large his makeshift pet really was.

Australian Museum's Search and Discover Department coordinator David Bock explained how the wasp and its young might take days to finish off the huntsman.

"What it'll do is pretty much drag it in a straight line back to its nest. It's already dug a burrow, so take the spider down while it's still alive. [The wasp] will then lay a single egg in it, the baby will hatch out and then it'll start to eat the spider alive," he added.

Mr Farrow-Palmer can be heard telling his mate to get something to measure the wasp. Source: Facebook
Mr Farrow-Palmer can be heard telling his mate to get something to measure the wasp. Source: Facebook

"It eats the spider bit by bit, leaving the vital organs last so it'll stay alive for longer."

Neither of the creepy critters are considered aggressive or venomous, while huntsmans are sometimes a welcome houseguest due to their reputation for eating cockroaches.