Time travel possible with multiverses interacting with one another, scientists theorise

International researchers believe time travel could be more than fiction, with scientists theorising multiple timelines are playing out in parallel universes.

Academics from Griffith University’s Center for Quantum Dynamics and the University of California are studying the probability of multiple universes coexisting and affecting each other in their “Many Interacting Worlds Theory”.

Not just science fiction, physicists are working on a new theory to prove time travel could exist.

According to the theory, the world that we know is just one of many expansive universes, where some are said to align with our reality, while others are completely different.

The theory of multiverses interacting has been around since 1957.

If it proves true, it could be possible for time travellers to visit Earth.

However, the research provides a new prospective on quantum mechanics (a study of matter and energy), which the scientists claim causes parallel universes to impact each another.

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"In the well-known ‘Many-Worlds Interpretation’, each universe branches into a bunch of new universes every time a quantum measurement is made,” Griffith University's Professor Wiseman told the Express.

Call the doctor? Academics believe the world that we know is just one of many expansive universes - where some are said to align with our reality, while others are completely different. Picture: AP

Fellow Griffith academic Dr Michael Hall believes the unconventional theory aligns with the status quo of scientific understanding, but also offers a new perspective.

"The beauty of our approach is that if there is just one world our theory reduces to Newtonian mechanics, while if there is a gigantic number of worlds it reproduces quantum mechanics.

"In between it predicts something new that is neither Newton's theory nor quantum theory.

"We also believe that, in providing a new mental picture of quantum effects, it will be useful in planning experiments to test and exploit quantum phenomena."