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Vincent takes $2.5m  plunge on bike lanes
Wheel power: Cyclists Shenade Unicomb, Marcus Taylor and Jackie Parker. Picture: Bill Hatto/The West Australian

The City of Vincent will spend an unprecedented $2.5 million over two years on new cycleways, which will make it one of Australia's most bike-friendly councils.

The council plans to double bicycle participation rates to 4 per cent and wants to increase that to 10 per cent within the next decade.

No council in Australia has participation rates of more than 5 per cent.

The City of Vincent, which has about 32,000 residents, will spend about $40 per capita annually on bicycle infrastructure to create a continuous path from the top of Mt Hawthorn, through Leederville and into the CBD.

Bicycling WA chief executive Jeremey Murray said the investment was unprecedented in WA.

He said Vincent's plan was especially significant considering the national benchmark for council bicycle infrastructure spending was about $5-$10 per person.

"This level of investment is unmatched by a local council in WA and is impressive even compared to the State Government's funding pledge of $10 million across the whole metropolitan area," Mr Murray said.

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The City of Fremantle has a bike plan costing $2 million over four years and the City of Perth plans to spend $2.5 million over five years.

About $1 million of Vincent funding will be spent on designated bike lanes along Oxford Street, while $650,000 will be invested on Bulwer Street and $515,000 on Scarborough Beach Road.

Newcastle Street, Palmerston Street and Vincent Street will also get new lanes.

About $420,000 of the total funding will come from grants.

Vincent mayor John Carey said the plan would benefit residents and all cyclists who rode through Vincent.

"Because we are a gateway council, our roads are used by cyclists from all over Perth to get to and from the city or to the northern or southern suburbs," Mr Carey said. "This will, therefore, benefit thousands and provide a much-needed bicycle corridor."

The plan was part of the City's vision to make neighbourhoods more "livable".