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The Morning After: If you want to test Apple’s Vision Pro, it’ll take some time

Demos at the Apple Store include a face scan and walkthrough.

Photo by Cherlynn Low/Engadget

After a fairly long wait, Apple’s debut mixed reality headset — its first new device since the Apple Watch — is almost here. The Vision Pro launches on February 2, and to ensure it fits as well in demos as it will in real life, you’ll have to put most of an hour aside to play.

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TMA (Apple)

According to Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman, customers who ask for a demo will have to go through face scans and the assembly of a custom Vision Pro, before sitting through a walkthrough of the interface, controls and device calibration. Apple Store employees will even scan glasses to figure out lens prescriptions for the Vision Pro. All of that could well burn through any intrigue and excitement for the headset, but at least you’ll get a meaty 25-minute demo.

If you’re planning to buy a Vision Pro in-store without trying, you maverick, you’ll still have to go through the face scans. However, you can jump through the rest of the hoops in your own time back home.

– Mat Smith

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TMA (Microsoft)

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