'Terrifying': 100-year heat record falls in Europe

·News and Video Producer
·2-min read

Norway has provisionally recorded its hottest September day, local meteorological services report.

History was made in the city of Drammen, 36km southwest of the capital Oslo, where temperatures soared to 28.6 degrees Celsius on September 8.

The country’s national weather forecaster, the Meteorologisk Institutt shared the news on Twitter yesterday (local time), adding that 11 heat records had been smashed in the country’s east and south this month.

The Norwegian city of Drammen (pictured) has recorded its hottest ever September day. Source: Getty / File
The Norwegian city of Drammen (pictured) has recorded its hottest ever September day. Source: Getty / File

Warmer air masses travelling from Southern Europe are believed to be the cause of the hotter conditions.

Calls for action on climate change following temperature record

British meteorologist Scott Duncan took to social media to add the record had stood for 100 years.

His words sparked concern amongst his thousands of social media followers across various platforms, with many saying more must be done to address climate change.

“This will trigger no meaningful action. Next year greater records will be set,” wrote one person.

“Even more bizarre that governments worldwide aren't feeling the urge to address this problem with great haste,” another respondent added.

"Most of my family live there, climate changing globally. Global warming is everyone's problem," someone else wrote.

Another horrified Twitter user simply added "Terrifying times". 

Weather records tumble across the globe 

This year has seen a spate of extreme weather events, with global data collated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) finding July was the world's hottest month in 142 years.

The news came as Europe recorded its hottest ever day just last month, with the Sicilian town of Syracuse having the unwelcome honour of being home to the record, provisionally recording a temperature of 48.8 degrees.

In July, the World Meteorological Organisation confirmed Antarctica recorded its highest ever temperature at 18.3 degrees on February 6, 2020.

Satellite imagery shows the effect of wildfires in Siberia. Source: European Union, Copernicus Sentinel-3 imagery
Satellite imagery shows the effect of wildfires in Siberia. Source: European Union, Copernicus Sentinel-3 imagery

This summer, Europe and the United States have been devastated by record flooding and wildfire events, as the world continues to be impacted by climate change.

Overnight, the European Union’s Copernicus satellite program released images shot over Sakha Republic in Siberia, confirming that fires are continuing to burn across the region.

They added that while the fires are not currently threatening human populations, the area currently affected is believed to be 88,566 hectares.

More on extreme weather across Europe and the US

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