Advertisement
SIGN UP for our newsletter ✉️ :

Get the latest stories delivered straight to you

Seven charged after total of 145 arrested during demonstrations on Armistice Day

Seven people have been charged after Saturday's mass pro-Palestinian march and a far-right counter-protest.

Some 145 people were arrested in total, The Metropolitan Police revealed in its update on Sunday, and at least 90 of these were far-right counter-protesters.

Several groups were described as "already intoxicated, aggressive and clearly looking for confrontation" by the Met’s Assistant Commissioner Matt Twist.

The charges include assault, possession of weapons, criminal damage, public order, inciting racial hatred and possession of drugs. They come after detectives from the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command and the Public Order Crime Team.

John Harvey, 75, of Pamela Street, Hackney, was charged with criminal damage, Ethan Stapely, 23, of Bradwell, Norfolk was charged with resisting arrest and Taylor Warne, 21, of Hastingleigh, Kent, was charged with possession of Class A drugs.

Meanwhile, 33-year-old Sam Fairclough, of Buckley, Flintshire and 42-year-old James Buckley, from Manchester, were charged with possession of an offensive weapon. William Duncan, 48, of Armadale, West Lothian, was charged with being drunk and disorderly and Karl Jordan, 47, of Burlington Lane, Hounslow, was charged with assault on an emergency worker.

The main pro-Palestine march, which saw an estimated 300,000 people descend on the capital to demand a ceasefire in Gaza, went ahead peacefully for the most part, The Met said previously.

Officers had to intercept a “breakaway group” of 150 at Grosvenor Place in the evening, where some were wearing face coverings and setting off fireworks. Several arrests were made after a few of the fireworks “struck officers in the face”.

“There were also a number of serious offences identified in relation to hate crime and possible support for proscribed organisations during the protest that we are actively investigating," The Met added.

A counter-protester is detained by police officers on Saturday (REUTERS)
A counter-protester is detained by police officers on Saturday (REUTERS)

The Met has since appealed for help identifying several protesters who demonstrated on Saturday "in relation to hate crime". One photo published in the appeal includes a woman with a poster displaying a swastika inside the Star of David.

In her first comments since Armistice Day, Home Secretary Suella Braverman condemned what she called the "sick, inflammatory and, in some cases, clearly criminal chants, placards and paraphernalia openly on display at the march".

Writing on social media site X on Sunday, she said: “Our brave police officers deserve the thanks of every decent citizen for their professionalism in the face of violence and aggression from protesters and counter-protesters in London yesterday. That multiple officers were injured doing their duty is an outrage.

"The sick, inflammatory and, in some cases, clearly criminal chants, placards and paraphernalia openly on display at the march mark a new low. Antisemitism and other forms of racism together with the valorising of terrorism on such a scale is deeply troubling.

"This can’t go on. Week by week, the streets of London are being polluted by hate, violence, and antisemitism. Members of the public are being mobbed and intimidated. Jewish people in particular feel threatened. Further action is necessary."

Pro-Palestine marchers on Vauxhall Bridge on Saturday (Getty Images)
Pro-Palestine marchers on Vauxhall Bridge on Saturday (Getty Images)
People set off fireworks during a pro-Palestinian protest in London (PA)
People set off fireworks during a pro-Palestinian protest in London (PA)

Mrs Braverman has been under fire for inflaming tensions after she branded pro-Palestinian protesters “hate marchers” and accused the police of bias for letting the rally coinciding with remembrance events go ahead.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is facing intensifying calls to sack her, with Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer accusing the Home Secretary of spawning “hatred and distrust, whipping up division and demeaning her office".

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Laurence Taylor, who led Saturday’s policing operation said: “Public order policing doesn’t end when demonstrators go home. We have teams of officers who continue to build cases against those in custody and launch investigations into those who come to our attention when images and videos are shared on social media.

“Since the end of Saturday's demonstration, we’ve published appeals in relation to six incidents and I have no doubt there will be more to follow. Our colleagues at the British Transport Police have published a further two appeals.

"We urge anyone who has information about the identity of suspects, or who has footage or photos of further potential offences, to get in touch so we can take the appropriate action.”