Residents disgusted after thousands of fish mysteriously die in suburban lake

Residents in a community north of Brisbane are disgusted by the deaths of thousands of fish in their local lake.

Those living near a Beachmere lake first noticed birds swooping before they realised thousands of fish were dead.

They moved to the lakeside town for the views, but for days now the view and smell has been of dead, rotting fish.

Residents in a community north of Brisbane are disgusted by the deaths of thousands of fish. Source: 7 News

About 30 species, big and small, have died in the lake, including mangrove Jack, bream, flathead, herring, and mullet.

Now locals are demanding answers from Moreton Bay Council.

“It’s been very sad to see the fish coming up and gulping for their lives. There were lots of them that didn’t make it,” resident Tracey Warr told 7News.

Locals living near a Beachmere lake first noticed birds swooping before they realised thousands of fish were dead. Source: 7 News

Council workers have been using boats, buckets and barrows to scoop up the decaying fish.

Residents have attempted to save those still barely alive, while experts have even tried to resuscitate some.

“[We’ve been] running them to the beach trying to save a few. We were wasting our time,” resident Danny Warr said.

The lake is supposed to be tidal. Locals have engaged an independent marine biologist to investigate and have been told an algae bloom may be to blame.

About 30 species of fish, big and small, had died in the lake including mangrove Jack, bream, flathead, herring, and mullet. Source: 7 News

“I think it’s a lack of understanding of the hydraulics of this system, a lack of maintenance,” resident Tom Ross said.

Thousands of fish died in the same lake almost a decade ago, but experts say the cause isn’t the same.

Council says water sampling is being undertaken to identify a cause of death and aerators are ensuring a good supply of oxygen in the water, but locals fear it’s too late. Source: 7 News

In a statement, council said “water sampling is being undertaken to identify a cause of death” and aerators are ensuring a good supply of oxygen in the water, but locals fear it’s too late.

“They’re still floating to the surface. A lot haven’t even risen yet,” Mr Warr said.

It follows a serious health warning issued for beach-goers at Rockingham, South Australia, after more than 1,000 dead fish washed ashore.

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