Paris terror survivor 'plays dead' to avoid gunmen

A 22-year-old South African graduate has shared on social media the graphic details of her struggle to survive inside the Bataclan, the bloody epicentre of the horrific attacks where 82 people were massacred.

Isobel managed to evade the attackers by playing dead for over an hour to avoid being killed by the gunmen who stormed the concert hall.

The 22-year-old South African graduate has since updated her profile picture. Source: Facebook.

The 22-year-old also posted a picture of a blood-stained shirt she was wearing during the attacks on social media.

Ms Bowdery went in to detail about hearing screams and lying in pools of blood while the chaos erupted around her.

On her post she wrote: ‘Dozens of people were shot right infront of me. Pools of blood filled the floor. Cries of grown men who held their girlfriends’ dead bodies pierced the small music venue.’

‘As I lay down in the blood of strangers and waiting for my bullet to end my mere 22 years, I envisioned every face that I have ever loved and whispered I love you.’

The former Cape Town University student thanks the many strangers that helped her during the night from the man who she credits for saving her life to a couple she heard exchanging loving last words.

22-year-old South African graduate has shared on social media the graphic details of her struggle to survive inside the Bataclan. Source: Facebook.

She also posted: 'The way they meticulously aimed at shot people around the standing area I was in the centre of without any consideration for human life. It didn't feel real. I expected any moment for someone to say it was just a nightmare. But being a survivor of this horror lets me able to shed light on the heroes'.

In her post she said at first she thought the gunmen were just part of the Eagles of Death Metal show, until they opened fire 'meticulously' on the helpless crowd resulting in the deaths of 82 people.

The blood stained top that Isobel wore to the concert. Source: Facebook.

Reports state that as the audience gradually understood they were caught in a siege, they tried to make themselves as invisible as possible.