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OPINION - Bishop of London: Easter gives us hope in a war-torn world that light may come from darkness

Bishop of London, the Right Reverend Sarah Elisabeth Mullally said that refugees are facing widespread homelessness (Stefan Rousseau/PA) (PA Archive)
Bishop of London, the Right Reverend Sarah Elisabeth Mullally said that refugees are facing widespread homelessness (Stefan Rousseau/PA) (PA Archive)

There is something very special about London at Eastertime. As the days get longer, sunlight warmer, and the trees start to blossom, everywhere we look is suddenly a technicolour reminder of the promise of renewal and rejuvenation. For Christians, this is a wonderful backdrop to our celebration of Jesus’s resurrection and the promise of new life which that holds for our world.

At its core, the Easter story is one of hope; the hope of God at work in the darkness, bringing a new creation to all. This desire to see a world born anew, where justice and peace prevail, could not be more relevant today. We are living in a period of great global instability, from the humanitarian crisis unfolding in Gaza and the war in Ukraine, to the cost-of-living crisis closer to home.

It is at times like these, when millions struggle in poverty and in the midst of conflict, we should be grateful to those who give their time, effort and money to eradicate these injustices. As Bishop of London, I constantly see the vital work of churches and local communities in the capital, supporting the disadvantaged. Today, as I take up a new task as the Chair of Christian Aid, the international development and humanitarian agency, I am thinking of those in desperate need across the globe who long for the hope of new life promised at Easter.

For over 75 years, Christian Aid has been at the forefront of efforts to eliminate poverty and create a more just and equal society across the world. Its mission and driving force have remained steadfast through decades of societal and economic upheaval; to be effective stewards of creation in the face of worldwide threats to God’s agenda of justice and peace.

Just as the darkness of Jesus’s tomb gave birth to new life, hope is possible in the harshest of circumstances. When we partner with those most affected by poverty, conflict and the climate emergency, we aid God’s mission of justice and peace to bring healing and new life.

Whatever your faith, I pray that this Holy Week is not only one of rest and quality time with loved ones, but that the Easter story inspires you to consider how we can all work together to bring new life, light and hope to our world.

The Right Reverend Sarah Elisabeth Mullally is Bishop of London