Man's roadside act praised by drivers: HERO OR HINDERANCE?

·Associate News Editor
·2-min read

The last thing motorists want at the moment is a hefty fine through the door with the cost of living sky high.

But thankfully drivers on the NSW Central Coast have a helping hand when it comes to avoiding penalty notices for going over the speed limit.

Seventeen-year-old Beau is warning motorists of upcoming speed cameras with a makeshift sign attached to his dirt bike, Nine's A Current Affair reports.

"I want to help people because times are tough and I think it's unfair what's happening," he told his father.

Beau says he's saving motorists 'heaps' on the roads. Source: Nine/ ACA
Beau says he's saving motorists 'heaps' on the roads. Source: Nine/ ACA

But Beau does not sympathise with those blatantly breaching the speed limit and says he would not warn motorists near schools or other areas of increased danger.

Yet he believes it's "unfair" for cameras to be placed at places such as the bottom of a hill and where speed limits drastically change suddenly.

The teen scours the local area for cameras on his bike and sets up shop roughly 100 metres away when finding one.

His so-called good deed has seen him become a popular figure on the roads, with motorists beeping and thanking him as they pass.

"He's saving us all our licences!" one excited motorist said.

Beau claims officers have told him the situation is a win-win, as it makes most drivers stick to the speed limit.

Beau is loved by passing motorists, with one calling him a 'national hero'. Source: Nine/ ACA
Beau is loved by passing motorists, with one calling him a 'national hero'. Source: Nine/ ACA

Revenue raising or saving lives?

Last year the NSW Labor party accused the government of caring more about profits than safety.

Warning signs were removed, which led to a huge spike in low-range offences last year.

"This is a blatant revenue raising exercise,” Opposition leader Chris Minns said in September.

The Perrottet government later backflipped on the decision, reintroducing warning signs in February, however the signs are located next to the camera giving motorists little warning time.

Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Paul Toole warned in December the state cannot pander to those breaking the law.

“We need to strike the right balance between giving a fair go to the majority who are trying to do the right thing, and ensuring those few who continue to deliberately risk lives cop the fine they deserve,” he said.

Makeshift warning signs are nothing new, with other residents across the state taking matters into their own hands.

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