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Incredible way pair survived in bush

Two German tourists have miraculously survived more than a week lost in the wilderness of remote Far North Queensland. Picture: 9News
Two German tourists have miraculously survived more than a week lost in the wilderness of remote Far North Queensland. Picture: 9News

Two German tourists have miraculously survived more than a week lost in the wilderness of remote Far North Queensland.

In a tale worthy of a blockbuster film, Philipp Maier and his friend Marcel Schoene spent days dodging crocodiles, crossing rivers, hiding from thunderstorms and battling the heat.

Attempting to drive from Cairns to Bamaga, the pair followed directions from Google Maps when they reached Coen and were led onto a dirt track into a national park.

Two German tourists have miraculously survived more than a week lost in the wilderness of remote Far North Queensland. Picture: 9News
Two German tourists have miraculously survived more than a week lost in the wilderness of remote Far North Queensland. Picture: 9News

Mr Maier and Mr Schoene became bogged about 60km in and tried to walk further before realising they were in serious strife.

Ultimately, Mr Maier said it felt like they were in a movie.

“I feel like in a movie, like in a bad movie but it was like with a happy end,” Mr Maier said.

“We tried to build a shelter, but that didn’t work really well.

“So we slept under the sky. It was raining the whole time but it was okay.”

He also said they had to run through a creek even though it contained a crocodile because it was their “only opportunity”.

Two German tourists have miraculously survived more than a week lost in the wilderness of remote Far North Queensland. Picture: 9News
Two German tourists have miraculously survived more than a week lost in the wilderness of remote Far North Queensland. Picture: 9News

After spending the gruelling week bush-bashing, the two young men finally made it back to Coen and sought help in the small town.

Queensland Parks and Wildlife ranger Roger James said he had no clue as to why Google Maps had provided such directions.

“Once they realised they were being led up a dry gully they pulled back and stayed with the vehicle as long as they could before making the decision to walk out,” Mr James said.