Advertisement

Ice rink poisoning puts 16 in hospital

Royal Show Wrap
A group of children have been hospitalised after suffering from a suspected carbon monoxide poisoning at an ice-skating rink in Adelaide’s west.

A group of children have been hospitalised after suffering from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning at an ice-skating rink in Adelaide’s west.

SA Health confirmed 16 people were admitted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital in the early hours of Sunday with high levels of carbon monoxide poisoning.

“Most patients are being observed while some have required oxygen therapy,” a spokeswoman said in a statement.

“They are all in a stable condition and expected to make a full recovery.”

Firefighters from the Metropolitan Fire Service arrived at the Ice Arena at James Congdon Drive in Thebarton at about 3am to test for harmful gases after receiving a call from the RAH.

Ice Arena
Ice Arena in Adelaide. Picture Emma Brasier.

The SA Metropolitan Fire Service confirmed they are still on the site, and carefully working to ensure conditions in the building are safe for the public once again.

“Crews have been working to ventilate the area with high-pressure fans since the early hours of the morning,” a media liaison said.

“They are working to manage the situation until the venue is safe for re-entry, and following handing the site back to venue management, will return to monitor [carbon monoxide] levels over the next twelve hours as a precautionary measure.”
A spokesman told Nine News they believed a dehumidifier and an ice resurfacer were responsible for the poisonings, and were currently investigating.

The MFS is handing information to SafeWork SA, who will be conducting investigations as to the cause of the incident.

It’s understood they will provide their official conclusions by Friday.

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, tiredness, nausea and in more severe cases, shortness of breath.

Chief Public Health Officer Professor Nicola Spurrier urged anyone with symptoms to get a check up immediately.

“Pregnant women and very young infants are also advised to be checked regardless of symptoms,” she said.