Heartwarming moment stray cat rescued amid deadly Bangladesh floods

·Environment Editor
·3-min read

Video shows a stray cat on a high wall, stranded by flood waters slowly rising in all directions on Sunday.

She’s one of the many millions of animals and humans stranded by the worst floods to inundate low-lying Bangladesh since 2004.

The ginger feline is silent as her rescuer approaches. She’s unsure whether to risk jumping into his arms.

A stray cat was rescued in the Sylhet region on Sunday. Source: Animal Rescue Bangladesh / Supplied
A stray cat was rescued in the Sylhet region on Sunday. Source: Animal Rescuers Bangladesh / Supplied
The cat is lifted to safety by a rescuer. Source: Animal Rescue Bangladesh
The cat is lifted to safety by a rescuer. Source: Animal Rescuers Bangladesh

Moments later the cat is safely being carried through knee-high waters, while pedestrians sheltering under umbrellas watch on.

The Sylhet region is one of the worst affected, and it was still recovering from flooding in May when the monsoonal rains returned last week.

Across India and Bangladesh, at least 59 people are confirmed dead from the extreme weather, which has been worsening each year as a result of manmade climate change.

Rescuer concerned flood conditions could worsen in Bangladesh

Rescue groups are working from early morning until late into the night to assist both humans and animals, but 27-year-old Mamiyat Chowdhury is concerned conditions may worsen.

“Last month the flood came and went away after seven days, but this time the flood has been increasing for five to six days,” she told Yahoo News Australia.

“If it continues to grow at this rate, it will be difficult for those of us who are helping to deal with it.”

Mamiyat Chowdhury and her team have been rescuing animals across the Sylhet region. Source: Heeramon / Supplied
Mamiyat Chowdhury and her team have been rescuing animals across the Sylhet region. Source: Heeramon / Supplied

Ms Chowdhury is a nurse working for rescue group Heeramon, which is preparing to feed one thousand animals across Sylhet.

Food is becoming scarce in some areas, leaving cats, dogs and even lambs in need of help. Rescuers are also housing dozens of displaced animals at their shelter.

Videos showing flood-impacted pets trending online

Subah Samaun Ohee, 19, rescues cats and dogs with her mother in the capital, Dhaka.

While the rain has been relentless at home, the situation in Sylhet has left Ms Ohee devastated.

Subah Samaun Ohee (right) and her mother rescue cats and dogs in Dhaka. Source: Supplied
Subah Samaun Ohee (right) and her mother rescue cats and dogs in Dhaka. Source: Supplied

Currently in the middle of year 12 exams, she’s been unable to personally travel, but has instead worked to raise money and supplies needed to send a three-person team to the region.

She’s called the group Animal Rescue Warriors, adding “It’s the name we came up with, there wasn't really much time to think”.

“In Sylhet it's terrible - people are dying drowning and so are animals,” she told Yahoo News Australia.

“There are photos all over the internet of floating dead bodies of cats and dogs in Sylhet.”

Her team is one of many small groups, some voluntary, others paid, which have travelled to Sylhet to assist.

Hungry flood-affected monkeys clamber for food

The cat rescued from the wall was saved by another small group, Animal Rescuers Bangladesh, which has focused on assisting strays.

Their rescuer Abdul Kaium Prince has also been helping wild animals in need, including a troop of monkeys that clambered down from powerlines to receive a much-needed meal.

A rescuer from RobinHood travelled to Sylhet to join emergency workers assisting both animals and humans. Source: Supplied
RobinHood the Animal Rescuer travelled to Sylhet to join emergency workers assisting both animals and humans. Source: Supplied

Afzal Khan, from charity RobinHood the Animal Rescuer, spoke to Yahoo News Australia briefly before his mobile phone reception cut out due to the extreme weather conditions.

He’s been rescuing both animals and humans since arriving in Sylhet from Dhaka two days ago.

“There are so many animals and humans having problems with the flood,” he said.

“We couldn’t stop our emotion when we came here and we rescued lots of lives.”

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