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Former Hells Angels hitman has parole suspended over death-threat charges

Dean Daniel Kelsie was one of four men accused of killing Sean Simmons. His murder was allegedly ordered by a Hells Angel who was upset that Simmons had an affair with his wife. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press  - image credit)
Dean Daniel Kelsie was one of four men accused of killing Sean Simmons. His murder was allegedly ordered by a Hells Angel who was upset that Simmons had an affair with his wife. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press - image credit)

The Parole Board of Canada has suspended day parole for Dean Daniel Kelsie, a former Hells Angels hitman, because he was allegedly intimidating co-workers.

Kelsie, 50, has been serving a life sentence since March of 2003 for second-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder. He has received additional convictions for assaults he committed while in prison.

Kelsie shot and killed Sean Simmons in the lobby of an apartment building in north-end Dartmouth, N.S., in October 2000. Kelsie was one of four men accused of the killing, which was allegedly ordered by a Hells Angel who was upset that Simmons had an affair with his wife.

His journey through the justice system has been long and complicated and included a ruling by the Supreme Court of Canada that reduced his conviction to second-degree murder from first-degree murder.

He was first granted day parole in 2021, and that has been renewed in six-month increments since then. Family and friends of Simmons remain opposed to Kelsie's release and have made submissions to that effect, including one earlier this month.

"In these statements, the victims discuss the severe consequences they still suffer from to this day," the parole board wrote in its decision. "They express how their lives were shattered by the murder, the undying trauma, hurt, drama, the fear and anxiety that is still felt today."

But Kelsie's latest problems stem from allegations he resorts to aggressive and threatening behaviour when he becomes angry or impatient.

Suspension to be reviewed in July

The parole board cited a confrontation at Kelsie's workplace in October, and paraphrased his description of what happened.

"You mentioned that your co-worker insulted you in another language and that he chased you to start a fight," the board noted.

"You also explained that you had managed your emotions appropriately, had not reacted and had avoided any confrontation."

However, the board got a different account from Kelsie's employer.

"According to the foreman supervisor, the conflict lasted three days and during which several phone calls from your co-worker were received to report that you had been threatening him and that he feared for his safety."

Police laid three charges of uttering death threats against Kelsie. Those charges are due to be heard in court in February.

Kelsie's day parole suspension runs until July, at which time it will be reviewed.

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