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Father arrested after son threatened school shooting had arsenal of ghost guns

A military defense contractor arrested after his teen son threatened violence at his California high school had an arsenal of weapons in his home, including a flame thrower and 29 assault rifles, nine of them unserialized, prosecutors said.

Neal Anders, a deputy engineer at Innovative Defense Technologies, was arrested earlier this week, after his 14-year-old son said he was going to shoot up Rancho Bernardo High School, 10 News reported.

The teen allegedly warned a small group of classmates “not go to school on Tuesday, the 30th, because he was bringing guns to school,” Deputy District Attorney Roza Egiazarian said during a court hearing on Thursday. Several students alerted school staff to the threat and the teen was arrested.

Authorities then took out a gun violence restraining order at the teen’s San Diego home, which is just blocks away from the school. A search of the residence turned up a rocket-propelled grenade and multiple concussion grenades — all of which were inactive — as well as 29 assault rifles, ghost guns, ghost-gun parts, flame throwers, armored vests, gas masks and “countless” manuals on how to make more ghost guns and explosives.

Police also suspect Anders attempted to hide 3D-printers, potentially used to create ghost gun parts, before their arrival, NBC 7 reported.

He was arrested and pleaded not guilty to 13 felonies, including including possession of an assault weapon.

Anders’ defense attorney, Gregory Garrison, said of all the weapons his client owned were in a locked case, but the prosecution pushed back, citing witnesses who heard the teen claiming the lock had been broken.

In addition to the teen suspect, another two children live in the home, Egiazarian said.

“This is obviously concerning, given the sheer quantity of weapons, illegal and legal, in the possession of one individual,” he added.

Anders remained behind bars on Friday in lieu of $300,00 bail. His son was also jailed in juvenile detention, though it’s unclear what charges he will face.