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Extreme cold warning returns for Windsor

A pedestrian in heavy winter clothing makes her way across a street in downtown Windsor in January 2024. (Dax Melmer/CBC - image credit)
A pedestrian in heavy winter clothing makes her way across a street in downtown Windsor in January 2024. (Dax Melmer/CBC - image credit)

Winter's sudden grip on Windsor continues with a return of an extreme cold warning on Tuesday.

Environment Canada's meteorologists issued the warning less than 24 hours after lifting the previous one.

According to the agency's weather watchers, Windsor-Essex should experience a low temperature of -17 C on Tuesday night, with wind chill bringing it down to -30.

Through the night and into Wednesday morning, southwesterly winds are expected to blow at speeds of 30 km/h to 50 km/h.

There's also a 30 per chance of flurries/

A Windsor pedestrian stays bundled up during frigid temperatures in January 2024.
A Windsor pedestrian stays bundled up during frigid temperatures in January 2024.

A Windsor pedestrian stays bundled up during frigid temperatures in January 2024. (Dax Melmer/CBC)

The current conditions present the risk of frostbite, Environment Canada noted.

And there will be no relief soon. According to Environment Canada's forecast, Windsor-Essex will remain in sub-zero temperatures at least until next week.

The chance of flurries will continue through the rest of the week, with heavier snowfall predicted for Friday.

"Extreme cold puts everyone at risk," Environment Canada cautioned.

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit has similar cautions for the public.

Dr. Mehdi Aloosh, WECHU's medical officer of health, issued his own extreme cold warning for Tuesday night and Wednesday morning.

Older adults, young children and infants are especially vulnerable during such weather — along with anyone who works outdoors and those experiencing homelessness, the WECHU stated.

"Frostbite occurs when both the skin and the underlying tissue are frozen, and can cause permanent damage to body tissue," the WECHU stated. "Hypothermia occurs when the body loses heat faster than it can produce it."

A man in high-visibility work gear walks outside in Windsor during frigid temperatures in January 2024.
A man in high-visibility work gear walks outside in Windsor during frigid temperatures in January 2024.

A man in high-visibility work gear walks outside in Windsor during frigid temperatures in January 2024. (Dax Melmer/CBC)