Dog forgotten in hot car for 7 hours by pet daycare dies

·2-min read

A dog has died after being forgotten in a hot car for seven hours by a Dubai-based pet daycare centre.

Kareem Kerry, 32, said he left his two-year-old husky named Albi in the care of the animal company while he and his partner Lauren, 27, went to work.

The dog handlers picked up Albi from the couple’s home at Jumeirah Lakes Towers.

Although the couple opted to not take legal action against the company due to their past relationship, they said they wanted to share Albi’s story so others could learn about the dangers of leaving animals in hot cars.

Albi, pictured with Kareem Kerry, 32, and Lauren, 27.
Albi, pictured with Kareem Kerry, 32, and Lauren, 27, was a two-year-old dog died when she was left inside a hot car for seven hours by a day care company, in Dubai. Source: Newsflash/Australscope

“To get the call that our dog was dead was just a horrendous experience,” Kareem, a restaurant manager from Trinidad, said.

“My wife was on her way to work at the time when she took the call. She was devastated, just broken.

“On the phone, the handler was trying to tell us what happened but all he could say was that he had just killed Albi. He was quite upset.”

The company sent the couple a letter explaining the events leading up to Albi’s death.

According to Kareem, the company said they collected the dog about 7am on July 12, when the temperature in Dubai was already exceeding 35C.

The handler said he started to feel ill and forgot about Albi when he arrived back at the kennels.

However, no one noticed the dog was not around until about seven hours later when Albi was missing from the photo register the company sends to clients to let them know their pets are safe.

Albi
Albi, a two-year-old dog died when she was left inside a hot car for seven hours by a day care company, in Dubai. Source: Newsflash/Australscope

By the time staff members got to the car, she was already lifeless on the back seat.

Dogs lose body heat by panting and when that fails, their body temperature rises and causes heatstroke.

As well as panting, other symptoms of overheating include vomiting, reddened gums, drooling, diarrhoea, dizziness or collapse.

“It should be remembered a dog can suffer heatstroke within just a few minutes and that can lead to cardiac arrest, so time is of the essence,” Local veterinarian Dr Aylott said.

“These cases should be considered an emergency and acted upon accordingly if an animal is in distress.”

Newsflash/Australscope

Do you have a story tip? Email: newsroomau@yahoonews.com.

You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and download the Yahoo News app from the App Store or Google Play.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting