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The cleanup begins following snow storm on the Avalon Peninsula

The snow is expected to stop falling by mid-day on Saturday. (Kyle Mooney/CBC - image credit)
The snow is expected to stop falling by mid-day on Saturday. (Kyle Mooney/CBC - image credit)
The snow is expected to stop falling by mid-day on Saturday.
The snow is expected to stop falling by mid-day on Saturday.

The snow is expected to stop falling by mid-day on Saturday. (Kyle Mooney/CBC)

Many facilities remain closed Saturday morning in the wake of a big dump of snow on the Avalon Peninsula.

The Metrobus and GoBus are off the roads for the day. The Avalon Mall and City of St. John's facilities will remain closed. As well, NLC Liquor Stores in St. John's, Mount Pearl, Paradise and Conception Bay South will not open Saturday. Also, Saturday masses at several churches in the St. John's area have been cancelled.

Additionally, over a hundred Newfoundland Power customers were without electricity Saturday morning. For 29 customers in St. Shott's on the south coast, the power has been out since Friday morning.

Highway route 13, commonly known as Witless Bay Line, remains closed with the 511 website describing the closure as being due to icy and slushy patches, drifting snow and snow clearing equipment being unable to operate there.

Meteorologist Rob Carroll with Environment Canada's Gander weather office says the storm should end sometime Saturday afternoon.

"We are on the very back edge of it now," Carroll said.

As of Saturday morning, Carroll said about 71 centimetres of snow fell in the St. John's airport area, 74 centimetres in East St. John's, 75 centimetres in Paradise, and 78 centimetres in the Northwest Avalon.

In the southern part of the Avalon, the Burin Peninsula, and Terra Nova east, there was between 25 to 45 centimetres of snow, Carroll said.

As for the rest of the province, Carroll said Central Newfoundland, Gander, Grand-Falls Windsor and parts of the Northeast Coast got 15 to 30 centimetres of snow, with most of that falling on Thursday night.

For Labrador and the rest of the island, Carroll said the storm has passed by with sunny clear skies and temperatures in the single digits.

Mike Vandenberg is another meteorologist at the Gander weather office. He said on average, Newfoundland sees about 57 centimetres of snow every March.

"So to get it all in one storm is certainly unusual," Vandendberg said. "And of course we're only a week into March. I'm sure there will be more snow to come."

There is another storm on the horizon coming in on Monday, but it will most likely bring rain. However Vandenberg said t's too early to determine how much.

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