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Canadian truck driver in U.S. court after $8.7M in suspected cocaine seized at Ambassador Bridge

Commercial trucks and passenger vehicles drive across Ambassador Bridge on the Canada-U.S. border. (Cole Burston/Bloomberg - image credit)
Commercial trucks and passenger vehicles drive across Ambassador Bridge on the Canada-U.S. border. (Cole Burston/Bloomberg - image credit)

A Canadian truck driver is in U.S district court in Detroit on Wednesday after allegedly trying to bring 290 kilograms of suspected cocaine across the border at the Ambassador Bridge — with the "intent to distribute."

Court documents say it happened just before midnight on Monday on the U.S. side of the crossing.

The documents said the transport truck driver was instructed to pull over under the bridge, but ignored the request and tried to continue to the tolls.

The commercial truck was hauling agricultural equipment.

Traffic flows over the Ambassador Bridge in Detroit Monday, Feb. 14, 2022 after protesters blocked the major border crossing for nearly a week in Windsor, Ontario.
Traffic flows over the Ambassador Bridge in Detroit Monday, Feb. 14, 2022 after protesters blocked the major border crossing for nearly a week in Windsor, Ontario.

The bust of suspected cocaine was on Feb. 5, 2024 around 11:45 p.m. on the U.S. side of the bridge. (Paul Sancya/Associated Press)

"CBP officers noticed the seal on the trailer doors did not match the seal on the paperwork," said the court filings.

"A search of the trailer resulted in the discovery of a white powdery substance which field-tested positive for the presence of cocaine."

The cocaine was packaged in cardboard boxes sealed with duct tape, according to the original criminal complaint.

A U.S. Homeland Security special agent said the drugs are valued at approximately $8.7 million U.S.

In a statement, the Ambassador Bridge Company congratulated Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers on the seizure.

"The Ambassador Bridge Company has worked closely with both the United States [CBP] and the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) for decades supporting their efforts on the front lines stopping dangerous drugs from entering our communities," said vice-president Kenneth Dobson.