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Big change for roadside speeding cameras after fines skyrocketed

NSW went from collecting about $4 million a year in low-range speeding fines to about $45 million, the new premier says.

All mobile speed camera vehicles in NSW are now equipped to carry portable warning signs in a reversal of the Perrottet government's decision to remove the signs back in 2020.

Warning signs must now be displayed during enforcement, including a retractable rooftop sign, two portable signs placed on approach to every mobile speed camera vehicle and one after.

"I would rather people slow down in the first place than receive a fine in the mail two weeks after they committed the offence," Premier Chris Minns said.

Fixed warning signs for mobile speed cameras were scrapped in November 2020, leading to a massive spike in revenue raised from low-level speeding offences.

Seeping camera warning signs must now be displayed during enforcement (pictured)
Warning signs must now be displayed during enforcement. Source: AAP

Mr Minns said the former government went from collecting about $4 million a year in low-range speeding fines to about $45 million during one financial year.

The number of fines where the speed limit was exceeded by 10km/h or less went from 3,222 in October 2020 to 27,855 by February 2021.

Following community backlash, the signs were partially re-introduced to return to the top of speed camera vehicles in 2021 but gave drivers no advance warning.

Mr Minns said he wanted "an end to the secrecy" with motorists having clear warning signs ahead of any speed cameras to remind them to slow down.

"We want drivers to slow down, we don't want people speeding in the first place," he said in a statement on Sunday.

Speeding cameras pictured on Sydney roads
The number of fines where the speed limit was exceeded by 10km/h or less went from 3,222 in October 2020 to 27,855 by February 2021. Source: AAP

Minister for Roads John Graham said the former government removed the warning signs without any community consultation and backflipped on their policy three times before accepting the warning signs should return.

"This is finally the end of a two-and-a-half year speed camera warning sign debacle," he said.

"It took three policy backflips before the former government came to the same view as the community and accepted that these cameras should have warning signs returned."

"The former government's triple backflip was so poorly executed that it has taken until now to finish the job," Mr Graham added.

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