Will you face a $2500 fine for leaving your bins out? Here are the suburbs affected

A new law could see some Australian residents fork out up to $2523 if they leave their wheelie bins out after they've been emptied.

Local residents of several Queensland councils have been left enraged at the proposal which would see some people slapped with a fine if they fail to collect their bins within 24 hours.

Councils of Mackay, Townsville, Rockhampton, Burdekin, Bundaberg, Gladstone and the Gold Coast will all implement the proposed law as of July 1, after a previous state law on wheelie bins expires, News Corp reported.

The old law, which allowed councils to issue the same fine, was rarely implemented and relied on residents submitting complaints.

Some Queensland residents are at risk of receiving the hefty fine if they continuously leave their bins in the street. Source: AAP
Some Queensland residents are at risk of receiving the hefty fine if they continuously leave their bins in the street. Source: AAP

Some councils have hit back at the uproar that has ensued after the law came to light, saying the fine is only for residents who persistently break the rules.

“In the case where someone complains that there is a land owner or occupier of a dwelling not doing the right thing by the environment, and people that live in that area, we need this local law or otherwise it is a free-for-all,” Mackay Regional Mayor Greg Williamson told News Corp.

Gladstone residents who have voiced concerns over going on holiday while their bins are out have been reassured they're not in danger of copping the fine.

Despite a similar law previously existing, some residents are outraged over the law since it came to light. Source: AAP
Despite a similar law previously existing, some residents are outraged over the law since it came to light. Source: AAP

“This isn’t Gladstone Regional Council coming out and fining people... it’s so council has an instrument, if necessary, for people who leave their bins out for months or years,” Region Mayor Matt Burnett said.

“It’s not about attacking mums and dads who are leaving their bins out one or two days late."

Mr Burnett said the biggest offenders were people who lived in apartments and often left their bins on the roadside for prolonged periods of time.

Brisbane City Council, Australia's largest council, also has the power to fine residents, leaving households $1260 out of pocket if they're unable to look after their bins.

Local Government Association of Queensland spokesman Craig Johnstone has previously said he believes the 24 hours given for residents to bring in their bins is ample time for homes to do so.

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