Woman who has lived in same house for 77 years sees value rise from £800 to £550,000

·Contributor, Yahoo Life UK
·4-min read
Winifred Flemming has lived in the same house for nearly eight decades. (SWNS)
Winifred Flemming has lived in the same house for nearly eight decades. (SWNS)

A great-grandmother who has lived in the same house for 77 years has seen the value of her property rocket from £800 to £550k.

Winifred Flemming, 106, bought her home after the end of WWII in 1945, and is believed to be Britain's oldest homeowner, still living at home.

The pensioner from West Wickham, Kent, doesn't want to move into assisted living, claiming she's still "fighting fit" and able to look after herself - and says there is no place she'd rather live.

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The house where Winifred Flemming has lived for 77 years. (SWNS)
The house where Winifred Flemming has lived for 77 years. (SWNS)

The pensioner purchased the home for less than £1,000 - and it's now estimated to be worth at least 550 times that.

She has carers who visit a few times a week to help her with washing and house work, and a gardener to maintain her front and back lawn, but remains fiercely independent.

Flemming says: "I worked extremely hard to afford this house - which I originally bought for just £800.

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"When I moved to West Wickham it was a lovely area and I've always had lots of friends and family around here.

"I've got so comfortable here over the years and a lot of my most cherished memories all took place within these walls.

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Winifred Flemming tended to her own garden for years. (SWNS)
Winifred Flemming tended to her own garden for years. (SWNS)

"I never considered moving as my whole life was built around my cafe business that I owned for 28 years.

"So much has changed since I first moved in it's hard to put into words how different the area looks when I step out my front door.

"During my time here I've done lots of work to the house and now it really is the perfect home. I plan on staying put for as long as possible."

Flemming was widowed after her husband Henry died in 1997 and had been living on her own up until last year.

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Winifred Flemming and her late husband Henry. (SWNS)
Winifred Flemming and her late husband Henry. (SWNS)

But the great-grandmother of four has since taken in her eldest daughter Yvonne Bloom, 84, who's health has severely deteriorated over the last 10 months.

Bloom suffers from Bipolar disorder and relies on her daughter Janine Bloom, 47, to do her weekly shop.

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Flemming was overjoyed to have her daughter moving back in with her at this stage of their lives, and hasn't given up her role of caring for her daughter.

Janine Bloom, a mum of two herself, said: "My nan is such an incredible woman.

"Up until recently she was fully independent, but she broke her hip just before her 103rd birthday which has impacted her mobility.

"She's such a caring person and she doesn't let her age affect her positive outlook on life.

"There may come a time where we'll have to start thinking about moving her, but at the moment she's going nowhere - she's made that very clear!

"She still takes cups of tea up to mum when she's not feeling well which I think is really incredible.

"Win is still reminding everyone when the bins need to go out every week, and what needs to be done round the house.

Despite having carers, Winifred still insists on cleaning and dusting her home. (SWNS)
Despite having carers, Winifred still insists on cleaning and dusting her home. (SWNS)

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"She always says 'I wish I could get out in that garden' because she spent so much time there over the years.

"Despite having carers come in, she always does her best to help them dust and tidy up.

"When we first got her some help she found it hard to relinquish control because she always wants to do everything for herself no matter what it is - that's just the type of person she is."

Additional reporting SWNS

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