'Social commentator' slammed for 'natural' birth control advice which 'could be fatal'

Melissa Buttigieg
News Reporter

A self-described social commentator has been slammed for tweeting a list of “natural” birth control alternatives that medical experts say don’t work, and some could actually be fatal.

Bria Badu has been accused of misinforming people for sharing unscientific information about non-hormonal contraceptives like ginger, figs, and various herbs.

A woman has been slammed for tweeting a list of “natural” birth control alternatives that medical experts say don’t work, and some could actually be fatal. Source: Bria Badu / Twitter

The listing of supposed “natural birth control options” caught the eye of botanist James Wong among others, who urged for the tweet to be removed immediately to prevent the further spread of misinformation.

The infographic reportedly received more than 14,000 likes before it was removed.

“As a botanist I can tell you this tweet with 1000s of shares could result in the deaths of women,” he tweeted.

Medical toxicologist Ryan Marino told Cosmopolitan that ingesting pennyroyal, which was advised in Ms Badu’s tweet as a method to induce abortion, can have serious side effects including liver toxicity and even death.

The woman, from Atlanta, Georgia, has since removed her tweet, but followed up with a series of others defending her actions.

“So, scientific Twitter is in shambles over my tweet on alternative BC [birth control] options,” she tweeted Wednesday.

“So let’s be clear. ANYTHING can be toxic when taken in excess. Don’t consume anything w/o the supervision of a medical provider you trust, whether that be your Dr, a herbalist, a holistic Dr, ya mama etc.”

The podcaster, who claims she created the Conscious & Lit brand with her best friend “to promote free thinking and personal growth”, said the attention around her initial tweet has opened the conversation about women making decisions about their own bodies.

“In short, people are free to do what the f*** they want to do with their bodies,” Ms Badu concluded. But people, including medical professionals, are still not buying it.

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