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White Sox RP Mike Clevinger not disciplined after MLB investigation into domestic violence allegations

Chicago White Sox starting pitcher Mike Clevinger (52) works out during a spring training baseball practice, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2023, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)
White Sox relief pitcher Mike Clevinger will not face any discipline after MLB investigated several domestic violence allegations against him. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Warning: The following article contains graphic descriptions of alleged domestic violence.

MLB announced Sunday that Chicago White Sox relief pitcher Mike Clevinger will not be suspended following an investigation into domestic violence and child abuse allegations made against him last year. Clevinger has avoided all discipline, though MLB said he will voluntarily submit to evaluations by the MLB/MLBPA joint treatment boards and comply with any of their recommendations.

MLB announced it would be investigating Clevinger in late January after 24-year-old Olivia Finestead, the mother of his 1-year-old daughter, accused him of multiple incidents of physical, verbal and emotional abuse, as well as an incident of child abuse.

Finestead shared her story with The Athletic in January, detailing two incidents in which Clevinger allegedly strangled her or slapped her and accusing Clevinger of throwing used chewing tobacco on their child. Finestead also posted about these alleged incidents on Instagram, sometimes including photos. In one Instagram post, she accused Clevinger of throwing an iPad at her while she was pregnant.

Here's what she wrote in an Instagram story from late January, in which she shared The Athletic's story about her and Clevinger:

“You really deserve hell,” Finestead wrote, “I’ve kept quiet for almost a year and you continue to covertly abuse your infant, withhold ALL of her belongings, we have none of our stuff, still not even her birth certificate or her car seat attachment. He’s made sure to do everything he can to keep control.”

Despite the active investigation, Clevinger was allowed to attend and participate in White Sox spring training activities, given that MLB players are not paid for spring training.