Brace for wet weather: Chance of stormy summer DOUBLES

·2-min read

Australians are being told to brace for a serious soaking over the coming months, with storms and possible floods to follow over summer.

The latest climate outlook from the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) released on Thursday forecasts above average rainfall for the NT, SA, Queensland, NSW, Victoria and eastern Tasmania for October to December.

It's predicted the wet weather could last into the new year.

Rainfall is likely to be above average for the eastern two-thirds of Australia and below average for northern WA and south-west Tasmania. Source: Bureau of Meteorology
Rainfall is likely to be above average for the eastern two-thirds of Australia and below average for northern WA and southwest Tasmania. Source: Bureau of Meteorology

Chance of a wet and stormy summer doubles

It follows updated modelling from the BOM, which raised the La Niña outlook status to watch level.

This means the weather pattern is twice as likely to form, increasing the risk of severe weather events in the northern and eastern states, where there will be a 70 per cent chance of higher rainfall.

It's predicted to be a wetter and stormier summer across Australia's east coast after the chances of another La Nina occurring were raised. Source: Bureau of Meteorology
It's predicted to be a wetter and stormier summer across Australia's east coast after the chances of another La Nina occurring were raised. Source: Bureau of Meteorology

“This status change follows cooling in the tropical Pacific Ocean and an increase in the number of climate models suggesting La Niña thresholds may be reached in the coming months,” the latest climate driver update read.

“La Niña events increase the chances of above-average rainfall for northern and eastern Australia during spring and summer.”

SES expecting busy storm season

It comes as the NSW State Emergency Service begins preparations for the upcoming storm season, which traditionally runs from October to March.

Commissioner Carlene York said volunteers are expecting a busy few months with the updated modelling suggesting a heightened risk of heavy rain and flash flooding.

SES flood rescue team members inspect floodwaters flowing over the New Windsor Bridge at Windsor in north western Sydney, Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Source: AAP
SES flood rescue team members inspect floodwaters flowing over the New Windsor Bridge at Windsor in north western Sydney during March. Source: AAP

“During the previous storm season, we experienced major floods right across the state,” Commissioner York said.

“In fact, it wasn’t long ago our volunteers responded to the major flooding event that overwhelmed communities across the Hawkesbury-Nepean, Hunter and Mid North Coast.”

That event alone saw the service respond to more than 14,000 requests for assistance, including more than 1,000 flood rescues.

“The more you can do now to prepare, the less likely you’ll end up needing emergency assistance from our volunteers when these weather events hit,” Commissioner York warned.

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