WA public sector review urges major reform

A review into Western Australia's public sector system has found it needs an overhaul to operate more efficiently and deliver better services.

The six-month Service Priority Review, headed by former New Zealand state services commissioner Iain Rennie, made 17 recommendations and suggested 37 actions, providing a "blueprint for reform".

Key recommendations include introducing whole of government targets to focus on community issues, implementing chief executive performance-based remuneration, and increased online service delivery.

Premier Mark McGowan on Wednesday said the government was on track to slash the number of senior executive service positions in the public sector by 102 by the end of March.

CPSU/CSA WA branch secretary Toni Walkington says the government needs to explain its service priorities and vision for the public sector.

"(The) blueprint for reform is the closest the government has come to achieving this. However, there is much still to be done," she said.

"The sector was already change-fatigued, and if the public sector plan process proposed by the Rennie review is not undertaken collaboratively, the last vestiges of goodwill for this government will evaporate."

WA Chamber of Commerce and Industry chief executive Deidre Willmott said the group had long called for whole of government KPIs, performance-linked executive pay and a focus on outcomes instead of input dollars to improve performance.

"These are standard practices in the business community to enhance efficiencies, and will significantly improve and modernise the community's interface with government," she said.

Ms Willmott also welcomed the recommendation for government services to be delivered online at a lower cost where possible.

"The WA government sits on a treasure trove of data that, if harnessed correctly, could help drastically improve service delivery and reduce costs," she said.

"It will also go a long way to responding to CCI members' calls for the government to improve functionality of government websites, planning and approval processes, and removing duplicative paperwork."

The state government broadly supports the recommendations and will begin implementing them next year.

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