WA to reveal assisted dying bill details

Details of legislation to allow voluntary assisted dying in Western Australia are about to be revealed ahead of the bill's introduction in state parliament later this month.

Premier Mark McGowan says the WA government will announce the details on Tuesday but until then won't be drawn on how many of an expert panel's 31 suggestions will be adopted.

"There's many recommendations that we'll take up," Mr McGowan told reporters on Monday.

"What we've tried to do is come up with a very reasonable, rational model with a great many safeguards in it.

"I just ask for a respectful debate on this matter."

A conscience vote will be held on the issue later this year.

Mr McGowan has vowed to support the bill and urged all MPs to listen to their communities before making up their own minds.

"People everywhere are saying they want this issue taken seriously and they want their loved ones to have this option if they are terminally ill or in pain," he said.

"Clearly people who are in agony and terminally ill want a choice and that's what I want to give them."

Health Minister Roger Cook urged all MPs "to behave themselves" when debating the divisive issue.

"I think members of parliament will see their way to actually support this legislation," Mr Cook said.

The expert panel recommended making adults who usually live in WA eligible for voluntary assisted dying if their death is reasonably foreseeable within 12 months.

The term is six months in Victoria, where recently the first person ended her life under the state's new assisted dying laws.

The WA panel also recommended a person must have decision-making capacities and make three requests, including one in writing witnessed by two people who will not benefit financially from their death.

It suggested a period of at least 18 months between the law passing and its commencement, and a review three years later.