WA electric shock girl waiting to go home

The West Australian government urgently needs to fund modifications which will allow an 11-year-old, wheelchair-bound electric shock victim to go home from hospital, social worker Gerry Georgatos says.

Denishar Woods was shocked with up to 230 volts when she touched a garden tap at a Beldon public housing property in March.

She was meant to go home next week but her family's state disability housing needs to be modified so she can be showered and sleep at home.

Her mother Lacey Harrison and Mr Georgatos met with Housing Minister Peter Tinley on Wednesday to discuss a five-point plan to help the girl.

Mr Georgatos says the housing department will push for a "substantial" ex-gratia payment to meet the immediate needs of Denishar's care.

He says it will also fund modifications to state-housing accommodation and a customised, special-needs vehicle.

"Hopefully the ex-gratia payment is within weeks or a couple of months," Mr Georgatos said.

Ms Harrison is suing the state government for the cost of her daughter's care but says it is likely they will settle out of court.

"At the end of the day it's not worth the hassle, I need to be there for my daughter and my kids," she told AAP.

Mr Georgatos said he was also hopeful the case would settle.