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Vigil for teenage boy killed in Pembrokeshire dumper truck crash

a group of people on a beach, each holding a light so that the group makes an s shape
People formed a wave of light on a beach near Aberporth beach to remember Llŷr Davies

More than a hundred people came together to remember the life of a 16-year-old boy by forming a "wave of light" on a beach.

Llŷr Davies died on 12 March after an incident at Gilfach quarry near Efailwen in Pembrokeshire.

His U16s coach for Newcastle Emlyn RC, Emyr Jones, said he was a "large character" who "enjoyed life".

"I think this is exactly what he would've wanted," he said of the light display on Dyffryn Beach at Aberporth.

"Llŷr has been brought up in Aberporth since he was a tiny baby," said an organiser of the event, Lisa Pritchard Evans.

"He loved the sea, he loved the land, a proper boy that loved everything to do with nature and the environment," she said, adding his "true love" was fishing.

"He's been brought up in this area. This is where his friends and family are."

Mr Jones said the large turnout showed "how many hearts he's hit with the tragedy".

"The numbers are unimaginable, the amount of people that have come far afield, not just local, the wider communities surrounding Aberporth and Newcastle Emlyn," he added.

Ms Evans said she worked with his brother and sisters to "get what they wanted".

"Waves, because he loved waves," she said. "Light, because he lit everyone up and was such a big personality and big hearted, smiley, bright person. It was the right thing to do.

"There's so many people that want to be here, want to share and show their support and want to show how much Llŷr affected them.

"He was just a one off and there will be a hole that will never be filled. "

Inquest and police investigation

The vigil came hours after an inquest into the teenager's death was opened and adjourned.

Dyfed-Powys Police has begun a full investigation into the circumstances of what happened, with the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) also assisting the probe.