Pictures reveal landscape of Britain's most remote island

·3-min read
Photographer Chris Orange's picture of the abandoned island of St Kilda. (SWNS)
The island of St Kilda. (SWNS)

The UK’s remotest island has been pictured in all its stunning glory.

Photographer Chris Orange, 47, captured St Kilda’s untouched landscapes in a series of images.

The island, which sits about 40 miles into the Atlantic from the Outer Hebrides, off the north-west coast of Scotland, is only accessible to the public for around four months of the year, for just a few hours a day.

Despite the time constraints, Orange captured its silent, rolling hills, and the jagged stacks of rocks rising from the sea, filled with hundreds of seabirds.

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The island is now abandoned. (SWNS)
The island is now abandoned. (SWNS)
The UK's remotest island. (SWNS)
It's the UK's remotest island. (SWNS)

Orange's favourite part of the trip was getting to see and capture the abandoned row of houses, which were once home to a community that lived on the island until the 1930s.

The crumbling stone cottages have now been left derelict after residents abandoned St Kilda nearly a century ago - and only the blue plaques on the houses remain to commemorate them.

Orange, who was photographing St Kilda for his upcoming photo book, Edge of the World, said: "It was a real privilege to be somewhere like that, especially when we have been stuck indoors for so long.

"People don't often believe it when I show them photos of such remote places like this.

"It's just a real contrast from the chaos you see on the news every day. It's so hard to find truly remote spaces in modern life."

Chris Orange on his trip to St Kilda. (SWNS)
Chris Orange on his trip to St Kilda. (SWNS)
A picture on the island from around 150 years ago when it was inhabited. (SWNS)
A picture on the island from around 150 years ago when it was inhabited. (SWNS)

Return boat journeys to the tiny island run up to just six times per week from either the Isle of Skye or the Isle of Harris.

Orange, from Haslemere, Surrey, said it was the "roughest" sea crossing he had ever experienced - and added this may be a reason that St Kilda is so scarcely-visited.

He said: "I've never been in sea so rough. The boat was basically taking off. As you get on the boat they give you sick bowls - because the crossing is almost never calm."

Another stunning image from St Kilda. (SWNS)
Another stunning image from St Kilda. (SWNS)
A old hut on the island (SWNS)
An old hut on the island (SWNS)
The images were taken for a new book called Edge of the World. (SWNS)
The images were taken for a new book called Edge of the World. (SWNS)

Orange added: "I've been trying to get out there for about three years. On my last attempt I almost made it, I'd hired a car and driven 15 hours to the Isle of Skye ready to catch the boat.

"But the trip was cancelled last minute due to a tornado warning.

"So it was a real privilege to finally get to go there and spend a few hours.

"It's a really interesting place to go to. It must have been such an incredible place to live - but it must have been quite desolate, too.”

Orange's new book, Edge of the World, is due to be released in October.

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