The man accused of killing at least 93 people in a youth camp massacre in Norway has said that the video game 'Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2' was a part of his training for the "long-planned mission".

Calling himself a crusader against a tide of Islam, 32-year-old Anders Behring Breivik has written in detail about how he used Activision’s 'Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 game' and Blizzard Entertainment’s 'World of Warcraft' game to help prepare for the attack.

“I just bought Modern Warfare 2, the game. It is probably the best military simulator out there and it’s one of the hottest games this year. I see MW2 more as a part of my training-simulation than anything else,” he writes in his hate-filled 1500-page online manifesto.

Breivik posted the manifesto, written in English, on Friday, describing his violent philosophy and how he planned his onslaught and made explosives.

The killings would draw attention to the manifesto entitled "2083-A European Declaration of Independence," Breivik wrote.

"Once you decide to strike, it is better to kill too many than not enough, or you risk reducing the desired ideological impact of the strike," he added.

He wrote that "target practise" was difficult for "urban Europeans like us" and recommended taking a shooting vacation to a country club or playing video games as alternatives.

Breivik, a self-styled founder member of a modern Knights Templar organisation, hints at a wider conspiracy of self-appointed crusaders and shows a mind influenced by the fantasy imagery of online gaming.

The link between the graphic video game and the terror attacks comes days after Australia's ministers agreed to create an R18+ rating for video games.

Pure evil

The worst peacetime massacre in the normally placid country's modern history appears to have been driven by Breivik's mission to save Europe from what he sees as the threats of Islam, immigration and multi-culturalism.

Police believe Breivik acted alone after becoming disenchanted with mainstream parties, even those that have gained popularity and parliamentary seats on anti-immigration policies in otherwise liberal and tolerant European countries, including affluent Norway.

At least seven people died in an initial blast outside the prime minister's office, in a calculated distraction for police allowing Behring Breivik to mow down 86 more -- mainly youths on the island of Utoeya, 40 kilometres away (25 miles). Others remain unaccounted.

The mostly teenaged victims on the island were attending a gathering of the main ruling Labour party's youth leaders.

Names and photographs are to be released shortly, and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg has called for a minute's silence to be held across the nation at noon on Monday.

The list is expected to include offspring of senior ruling party figures. A teary-eyed Stoltenberg labelled the aggressor "evil" during tributes at a memorial mass attended by Norway's royal family and thousands of worshippers on Sunday.

That Breivik deliberately surrendered to police when finally confronted on the tiny island of Utoeya after cold bloodily gunning down 86 youngsters underlines his desire to grab a public platform to deliver his radical thoughts.

In other instances of gunmen going on killing sprees the perpetrators often commit suicide when the police arrive or actively provoke officers to shoot them dead.

It was not clear how long Breivik will have to talk in court since the hearing will be about custody and he will not be required to enter a guilty or innocent plea.

Police on Monday played down a report in Norwegian media they had already decided to asked for the hearing, in which a judge is set to remand him in custody, to be held behind closed doors.

"It's up to the judge to decide. It's not uncommon that the police will ask for it in advance but I don't know if the police will ask for that," Liv Corneliussen, a police prosecutor, told Reuters.

The issue could trigger a debate about freedom of expression with many Norwegians opposed to allowing a man who has shaken the nation's psyche the right to speak out.

"He explains himself fairly calmly, but every now and then expresses emotion," Lippestad said. "He buries his head in his hands."

"He has said that he believed the actions were atrocious, but that in his head they were necessary," he said, adding his client did not feel he deserved punishment.

The worst peacetime massacre in the normally placid country's modern history appears to have been driven by Breivik's mission to save Europe from what he sees as the threats of Islam, immigration and multi-culturalism.

Police believe Breivik acted alone after becoming disenchanted with mainstream parties, even those that have gained popularity and parliamentary seats on anti-immigration policies in otherwise liberal and tolerant European countries, including affluent Norway.

At least seven people died in an initial blast outside the prime minister's office, in a calculated distraction for police allowing Behring Breivik to mow down 86 more -- mainly youths on the island of Utoeya, 40 kilometres away (25 miles). Others remain unaccounted.

The mostly teenaged victims on the island were attending a gathering of the main ruling Labour party's youth leaders.

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