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Fleetingly I was a research guinea pig - known as patient 016 - after enlisting in a trial to test the side effects from a strain of bacteria.

If all went well, I would swallow a concoction infected with a bug in much the same way as a famous Perth researcher tested a theory 30 years earlier about what caused stomach ulcers.

Despite facing a fairly gruelling schedule of tests, I felt safe in the Nobel prize-winning hands of that same researcher, Barry Marshall.

The reimbursement was never the attraction but I did a double-take when I read the patient notes and saw it totalled more than $2000.

But it became a mute point after I was politely kicked out, deemed ineligible by an infection I never knew I had.

Others would have to help Professor Marshall enter the next stage of his groundbreaking research into his famous helicobacter pylori.

I had seemed to fit the bill until Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital clinical trials co-ordinator Jim Blanchard tested my blood.

It came back positive, showing I had previously had helicobacter and developed antibodies.

Apparently people often do not know they had the bug but took antibiotics for an unrelated infection and the "collateral damage" was that the helicobacter was wiped out too.

I could not continue with the trial because my antibodies would resist any infection the researchers tried to give me.

So I was off the hook to swallow the broth and have more tests, leaving me a little relieved but also disappointed.

So far nine volunteers have passed the test, including doctors and students, but they need 24. Volunteers can call 0488 159 419.