Man says bar ruled his mullet did not make cut
Man says bar ruled his mullet did not make cut

It has long been a controversial fashion - but now debate on the merits of the mullet has been reignited after a Morley man claims he was ejected from one of Perth's newest bars because of his hairstyle.

Having sported his mullet for almost a decade, David Hoogland said he was surprised when bouncers told him to leave Print Hall's rooftop bar on Friday night.

He had been drinking with fiancee Sarah Sorgiovanni and friends and said his hair had never been an issue before.

GALLERY

"I'm not in a gang, I don't have tattoos all over me, I'm just an everyday person," Mr Hoogland said.

"I agree if you're being rowdy, out of control, drunk or abusive then you should be kicked out but if you're just sitting down having a chat and a quiet social drink, I think that's pretty rude."

Wearing jeans, T-shirt and dress shoes, Mr Hoogland said he had been inside half an hour. When he asked why he had to leave, he said he was told it was because of his hair.

Print Hall management did not respond to requests for comment. Print Hall chief executive Lyndon Waples declined to comment.

Under WA law, venues are free to set dress codes and refuse entry to patrons but cannot discriminate on the basis of sex, race or religion.

Most inner-city bars contacted said they had a dress code, though it varied between venues and there were few hard and fast rules.

Venn Gallery Bar Cafe manager Michael Krui said beyond a ban on board shorts and thongs, which were not allowed under the Queen Street bar's licence, the dress code was "very open and free".

Events manager at The Trustee Bar and Bistro, Marinela Antonic, said the bar did not have a dress code, putting more emphasis on attitude.

Rubber thongs would be a health hazard but anyone with a positive attitude looking to have fun would be welcome.

The West Australian

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