Pack light and forget Justine Case
Lydia models mix-and-match designs from Liz Davenport.

Ask a woman how many garments she took on her last holiday and the chances are the answer will be 44. Ask her how many she actually wore, and the answer is likely to be much smaller - 22.

VOYAGE WITH THE ANCIENTS
WE'RE WARMING TO RADIANCE
AMUSING YOUNG SEA ADVENTURERS
HIGH SEAS HOLIDAY HOT SPOTS
SET SAIL FOR A FUN RIO BEAT
MORE TO VALPARAISO THAN MEETS THE EYE

Seems there's more than a shred of truth in the stereotype of the female holidaymaker spending hours, if not days, packing and then taking too many clothes as a result.

At least that's according to the survey conducted earlier this year for a British travel company, The Co-operative.

The survey's findings were quoted by WA fashion icon Liz Davenport at a fashion-for-cruising show, organised by Claremont Cruise and Travel centre, held last week at Davenport's Nedlands headquarters.

In fact, she started the evening's proceedings by pointing to a suitcase that would become part of the show.

"Justine Case", she called it, adding: "There's a little bit of her in all of us!" She had an answer to the overpacking, and out of the suitcase (it wasn't big but it could have been even smaller, she said) came practically all the garments she said the female traveller would need for a cruise - even a lengthy circumnavigation of Australia.

Whereas the travel survey reckoned "Ms Average" packed 18 tops and 12 pairs of shirts or shorts, Ms Davenport argues she could have easily managed with garments counted on the fingers of one hand - a couple of pairs of pants, jackets and tops, and some garments like scarves.

The "must have" garment, she said, was three-quarter pants.

The secret? Firstly, colour co-ordination. "All the pieces must mix and match with every other piece," she said.

So white, black and taupe are the staples to be mixed with garments with highlight colours.

Secondly, the flexibility and adaptability of the garments is crucial. Linings made separately to the skirt and in a different colour, for example, increased the variation.

Plus, her garments could be worn upside down and back to front as well as inside out.

As a mere male, I struggled with this concept and I'm not sure it would work with my wardrobe; but, believe me, with Davenport designs it works and very successfully, too.

The third ingredient of success was the material - stretch crepes and silk. Light, uncrushable and, importantly, comfortable.

Ms Davenport also noted: "Everything has elasticised waists, because the average weight one puts on on a cruise is 6kg."

How to pack:
HOW MANY UNDIES DO YOU PACK?
HOW TO TRAVEL WITHOUT STRESS
HOW TO PACK LIGHT WITH COSMETICS
MIND YOUR LUGGAGE
HERE'S TO YOUR GOOD HEALTH

The models for the evening were young women from The Esther Foundation - a charitable program that's been operating for 18 years and which helps girls and women between 13 and 33 struggling with various difficulties in their lives such as eating disorders.

Half a dozen Esther Foundation "graduates" proudly helped model the Davenport fashions in their debut appearance on the catwalk.

The West Australian

Popular videos

Compare & Save

Our Picks

More from The West