Unbeaten WA star Barakey will face the mammoth task of starting first-up in the Newmarket Handicap after his shock scratching at the barriers in Saturday's Oakleigh Plate at Caulfield.

Trainer Jim Taylor yesterday confirmed Barakey would push on to the Group 1 Newmarket Handicap (1200m) at Flemington on Saturday week, despite a disastrous start to his interstate campaign.

Starting a heavily-supported favourite, Barakey was scratched after striking his head on his stall when trying to burrow through the front of the stall.

The winner of all of his 11 races in WA reacted to a rival nearby kicking its stall, following a long delay for the field when second favourite Shamal Wind was removed from her barrier and inspected by a veterinarian.

Taylor did not blame Racing Victoria officials for Barakey's withdrawal, despite believing the Group 1 Winterbottom Stakes winner would have been fine to start.

"I think he would have been right to start but they weren't to know. You can't blame them," Taylor said.

"It would have been nice to race but it's just one of those things.

"He was as fit as he has ever been leading into a race.

"He's good as gold and very bright. He was on the water walker (yesterday) for the first time and enjoyed it."

Barakey will have some history to overcome in the Newmarket. The last galloper to win the race first-up was Polycrates in 1917.

Barakey needs to take part in a jump-out - likely to be at Flemington tomorrow week - to the app- roval of stewards before he can start in the $1 million feature.

"That shouldn't be a problem. I wanted to give him a look down the straight anyway," Taylor said.

"History shows the Newmarket is really hard to win first-up. We had the perfect plan to have him go in it second-up but that's not the case now."

Fellow WA star Mr Moet ran an impressive second to Foreteller in the Group 2 Peter Young Stakes (1800m) on Saturday, but trainer Adam Durrant landed in hot water with RV stewards.

An inquiry was opened after the Compliance Assurance Team raided stables housing Mr Moet before the race. CAT stewards alleged they saw Durrant with an alkalising agent and the Chinese medicine Yunnan Baiyo.

Chief steward Terry Bailey was concerned the Chinese medicine was to be used for a pre-race treatment, but Durrant said it was for when Mr Moet returned to the stables.

RV vet Brian Stewart said the medicine was used mainly as an anti-bleeding medication.

"He was as fit as he has ever been leading into a race. He's good as gold and very bright.""Trainer *Jim Taylor *

The West Australian

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