Pseudoscorpion Synsphyronus christopherdarwini is 3mm and resembles a tiny scorpion, but lacking the long tail and sting of its cousin.
Pseudoscorpion Synsphyronus christopherdarwini is 3mm and resembles a tiny scorpion, but lacking the long tail and sting of its cousin.

A new species of pseudoscorpion found in the Mid West has been named in honour of Charles Darwin's great-great-grandson.

Synsphyronus christopherdarwini was found during a Bush Blitz expedition to Bush Heritage Australia's Charles Darwin Reserve, 355km north-east of Perth.

Western Australian Museum head of terrestrial zoology Dr Mark Harvey led the arachnid-focused team that discovered the new species.

"The pseudoscorpion was brought back to the WA Museum where the species was determined unique, characterised by the distinctive size and shape of its pedipalps or claws at the front of the body," he said.

Dr Harvey said Chris Darwin, who also took part in the expedition, was the obvious choice when naming the new species.

"Chris made a huge personal and financial commitment to the conservation of Australia's biodiversity — in 2003, he and his wife Jacqui made the donation that allowed Bush Heritage to purchase Charles Darwin Reserve," he said.

"If it wasn't for people like him, properties like the Reserve wouldn't be maintained for conservation, and the environments of species like this one wouldn't be protected."

Mr Darwin, a nature guide from the Blue Mountains, New South Wales and Bush Heritage Australia ambassador said he was extremely surprised and humbled by the naming.

Bush Blitz is a biodiversity discovery partnership between the Australian Government, BHP Billiton and Earthwatch Australia to survey properties across Australia's National Reserve System.

Popular videos

Compare & Save

Our Picks

Compare & Save

More from The West