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Reviving the Pacific solution has already cost taxpayers $80 million in the two months since the first boat people were sent to Nauru.

Contractual information and tender documents collated by _The West Australian _outline how millions of dollars have been spent, including thousands on foreign language books and DVDs.

The $80 million figure excludes the $3000 fee for a three-month visa the Nauruan Government wants to bill Australia for each asylum seeker - a charge that would reap the tiny island nation $18 million a year once the camp is full.

The biggest costs accrued so far are six-month contracts with Transfield Services, the Salvation Army and International Health and Medical Services.

Transfield Services is getting $26 million for catering, accommodation and security.

The Salvation Army is collecting $22 million to provide welfare and case management services, while IHMS's contract is for $21.9 million.

Thirteen charter flights ferrying asylum seekers to Nauru from Christmas Island and Darwin have cost taxpayers almost $3 million.

While asylum seekers sleep in tents as they wait for permanent accommodation, tenders for almost $1.4 million of construction work have been awarded.

A portable kitchen has been rented for nine months for $1.9 million.

Buses have been bought for $214,400 and a Sydney store was paid $10,157 for books and DVDs.

There are now 401 asylum seekers detained on Nauru but it will eventually hold 1500. Former Defence Force chief Angus Houston's expert panel estimated it would cost up to $1.4 billion over four years to detain boat people there.

Most of the detainees ended their hunger strike yesterday after almost two weeks. Six Iranians are continuing the hunger strike, including one now on his 34th day without food.

Another 30 Sri Lankan men were deported yesterday, bringing to 200 the number of boat people sent back to their homeland since August 13.

One boat with six passengers and two crew was intercepted near Ashmore Reef on Monday.