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Magazines were not child porn
In court: Harry Holland. Picture: Ben Crabtree/The West Australian

A Perth man who had three editions of a 1980s magazine called Rockspider, which was allegedly targeted at paedophiles and contained sexually explicit stories, denies the material is child pornography.

Harry Holland, who changed his name by deed poll from Colin Nugent in 1991, went on trial in the District Court yesterday, defending an allegation he possessed child pornography in the form of the magazines found in his unit by police in March 2010.

Opening the State's case yesterday, Brad Hollingsworth said the issues of Rockspider - a term used to describe paedophiles - contained articles about children that were of a highly explicit sexual nature as well as pictures, drawings, letters and interviews with people claiming to be paedophiles.

The prosecutor told the jury one of the issues contained a fictional story about a 12½-year-old boy's sexual encounter with a boy named Gavin and an article entitled Fantasy about a middle-aged man's sexual encounters with boys in the Philippines.

One edition also had an interview with three boys, aged 10, 13, and 16, about their relationships with men in the Netherlands.

Defence lawyer Justine Fisher said Mr Holland denied the magazines were child pornography and it would be argued that he did not know the material would likely offend a reasonable adult.

She said the magazines, dated February 1983, June 1983 and June 1985, were "very makeshift" and rough documents, created in a "very different" political, social and cultural climate.

It is not alleged Mr Holland created the magazines.

Mr Hollingsworth said the State would argue the material in the magazines was "blatantly child pornography" and intended to be disseminated in public to a target audience.

He said some of the articles used graphic and descriptive language and were aimed at sexually stimulating and titillating the reader.

Ms Fisher told the jury Mr Holland had a literary background and out of "hundreds and hundreds" of books and documents in his home, the only items police charged him over were the three magazines.