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A senior leader at one of Perth's most prestigious boys' schools says students as young as 13 believe explicit sexual practices seen in online pornography are normal behaviour because their parents allow them unlimited access to the internet.

Hale School head of senior school Ross Barron has criticised parents for "putting their heads in the sand" and failing to make informed decisions about their sons' internet use.

"Our health education teachers tell me of conversations with Year 8 and particularly Year 9 and Year 10 boys who think it is normal behaviour to give oral sex as a 13-year-old and that anal and oral sex are not actually going all the way," Mr Barron wrote in the school newsletter published yesterday.

"Would boys and girls 20 or so years ago have had the same perceptions?"

He said it was "disappointing" that only 30 or 40 parents attended a cyber safety session held at the school last week.

The free event presented by the Australian Communications and Media Authority was open to all parents at the school, which has more than 1400 students, but aimed mostly at those of older boys.

Mr Barron said many parents did not seem to understand that by giving their son unlimited smartphone use, they were allowing him unfiltered access to any information he may choose to investigate.

"Often it includes bestiality and hardcore pornography," he said.

"Research is telling us that at a crucial period of adolescent growth in sexual awareness, many young people are being affected by a skewed perception of what is a normal sexual relationship."

He questioned why boys should have internet access on three different electronic devices, with no restrictions, and urged parents to discuss responsible internet use with their sons.

Edith Cowan University communications professor Lelia Green, who has researched children's cyber safety, said Mr Barron's warnings were "alarmist".

"Bestiality is illegal content and it would often be hidden behind pay walls that kids wouldn't be able to access," she said.

"The majority of sexual images seen by children are still seen in magazines, DVDs, movies, compared with online."

Professor Green said pornography had been around for generations and the best way to protect children was to talk to them about what they had seen online.

"Children are brought up to know that what they see on the screen is not a transparent view of real life," she said.